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What Can I Afford?

This Mortgage Calculator can be used to estimate your monthly payments.  Enter the price of the home, your desired loan term, your down payment percentage, and the loan’s interest rate.

Down Payment: $40,000.00 Amount Financed: $160,000.00 Monthly Payment
(Principal & Interest Only):
$763.86 Residential (or Property) Taxes are a little harder to figure out... Let's say that your property's assessed value is 85% of what you actually paid for it - $170,000.00. This would mean that your yearly residential taxes could be around $2,380.00. This could add $198.33 to your monthly payment. Total Monthly Payment Including Residential Tax: $962.20
 
Sale Price Of Home In Dollars
Percentage Down Percent
Mortgage Length Years
Annual Interest Rate Percent
1 The down payment = The price of the home multiplied by the percentage down divided by 100 (for 5% down becomes 5/100 or 0.05)

$40,000.00 = $200,000.00 X (20 / 100)
2 The interest rate = The annual interest percentage divided by 100

0.04 = 4% / 100
The monthly factor = The result of the following formula:
3 The monthly interest rate = The annual interest rate divided by 12 (for the 12 months in a year)

0.0033333333333333 = 0.04 / 12
4 The month term of the loan in months = The number of years you've taken the loan out for times 12

360 Months = 30 Years X 12
5 The montly payment is figured out using the following formula:
Monthly Payment = 16000000 * (00033 / (1 - ((1 + 00033)-(360))))

The amortization breaks down how much of your monthly payment goes towards the bank's interest, and how much goes into paying off the principal of your loan.

Amortization for monthly payment: $763.86 over 30 years:

MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
1$533.33$230.53$159,769.47
2$532.56$231.30$159,538.17
3$531.79$232.07$159,306.10
4$531.02$232.84$159,073.25
5$530.24$233.62$158,839.63
6$529.47$234.40$158,605.24
7$528.68$235.18$158,370.05
8$527.90$235.96$158,134.09
9$527.11$236.75$157,897.34
10$526.32$237.54$157,659.80
11$525.53$238.33$157,421.47
12$524.74$239.13$157,182.34
Totals for year 1
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 1
$6,348.72 will go towards INTEREST
$2,817.66 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
13$523.94$239.92$156,942.42
14$523.14$240.72$156,701.70
15$522.34$241.53$156,460.17
16$521.53$242.33$156,217.84
17$520.73$243.14$155,974.70
18$519.92$243.95$155,730.75
19$519.10$244.76$155,485.99
20$518.29$245.58$155,240.41
21$517.47$246.40$154,994.02
22$516.65$247.22$154,746.80
23$515.82$248.04$154,498.76
24$515.00$248.87$154,249.89
Totals for year 2
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 2
$6,233.92 will go towards INTEREST
$2,932.45 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
25$514.17$249.70$154,000.19
26$513.33$250.53$153,749.66
27$512.50$251.37$153,498.29
28$511.66$252.20$153,246.09
29$510.82$253.04$152,993.05
30$509.98$253.89$152,739.16
31$509.13$254.73$152,484.42
32$508.28$255.58$152,228.84
33$507.43$256.44$151,972.41
34$506.57$257.29$151,715.12
35$505.72$258.15$151,456.97
36$504.86$259.01$151,197.96
Totals for year 3
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 3
$6,114.45 will go towards INTEREST
$3,051.93 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
37$503.99$259.87$150,938.09
38$503.13$260.74$150,677.35
39$502.26$261.61$150,415.75
40$501.39$262.48$150,153.27
41$500.51$263.35$149,889.91
42$499.63$264.23$149,625.68
43$498.75$265.11$149,360.57
44$497.87$266.00$149,094.57
45$496.98$266.88$148,827.69
46$496.09$267.77$148,559.92
47$495.20$268.66$148,291.25
48$494.30$269.56$148,021.69
Totals for year 4
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 4
$5,990.11 will go towards INTEREST
$3,176.27 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
49$493.41$270.46$147,751.24
50$492.50$271.36$147,479.87
51$491.60$272.26$147,207.61
52$490.69$273.17$146,934.44
53$489.78$274.08$146,660.35
54$488.87$275.00$146,385.36
55$487.95$275.91$146,109.44
56$487.03$276.83$145,832.61
57$486.11$277.76$145,554.86
58$485.18$278.68$145,276.17
59$484.25$279.61$144,996.56
60$483.32$280.54$144,716.02
Totals for year 5
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 5
$5,860.70 will go towards INTEREST
$3,305.67 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
61$482.39$281.48$144,434.54
62$481.45$282.42$144,152.13
63$480.51$283.36$143,868.77
64$479.56$284.30$143,584.47
65$478.61$285.25$143,299.22
66$477.66$286.20$143,013.02
67$476.71$287.15$142,725.86
68$475.75$288.11$142,437.75
69$474.79$289.07$142,148.68
70$473.83$290.04$141,858.64
71$472.86$291.00$141,567.64
72$471.89$291.97$141,275.67
Totals for year 6
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 6
$5,726.02 will go towards INTEREST
$3,440.35 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
73$470.92$292.95$140,982.72
74$469.94$293.92$140,688.80
75$468.96$294.90$140,393.90
76$467.98$295.88$140,098.02
77$466.99$296.87$139,801.14
78$466.00$297.86$139,503.28
79$465.01$298.85$139,204.43
80$464.01$299.85$138,904.58
81$463.02$300.85$138,603.73
82$462.01$301.85$138,301.88
83$461.01$302.86$137,999.02
84$460.00$303.87$137,695.15
Totals for year 7
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 7
$5,585.86 will go towards INTEREST
$3,580.52 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
85$458.98$304.88$137,390.27
86$457.97$305.90$137,084.38
87$456.95$306.92$136,777.46
88$455.92$307.94$136,469.52
89$454.90$308.97$136,160.55
90$453.87$310.00$135,850.56
91$452.84$311.03$135,539.53
92$451.80$312.07$135,227.46
93$450.76$313.11$134,914.36
94$449.71$314.15$134,600.21
95$448.67$315.20$134,285.01
96$447.62$316.25$133,968.76
Totals for year 8
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 8
$5,439.98 will go towards INTEREST
$3,726.39 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
97$446.56$317.30$133,651.46
98$445.50$318.36$133,333.10
99$444.44$319.42$133,013.68
100$443.38$320.49$132,693.19
101$442.31$321.55$132,371.64
102$441.24$322.63$132,049.01
103$440.16$323.70$131,725.31
104$439.08$324.78$131,400.53
105$438.00$325.86$131,074.67
106$436.92$326.95$130,747.72
107$435.83$328.04$130,419.68
108$434.73$329.13$130,090.55
Totals for year 9
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 9
$5,288.16 will go towards INTEREST
$3,878.21 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
109$433.64$330.23$129,760.32
110$432.53$331.33$129,428.99
111$431.43$332.43$129,096.56
112$430.32$333.54$128,763.01
113$429.21$334.65$128,428.36
114$428.09$335.77$128,092.59
115$426.98$336.89$127,755.70
116$425.85$338.01$127,417.69
117$424.73$339.14$127,078.55
118$423.60$340.27$126,738.28
119$422.46$341.40$126,396.88
120$421.32$342.54$126,054.33
Totals for year 10
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 10
$5,130.16 will go towards INTEREST
$4,036.22 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
121$420.18$343.68$125,710.65
122$419.04$344.83$125,365.82
123$417.89$345.98$125,019.84
124$416.73$347.13$124,672.71
125$415.58$348.29$124,324.42
126$414.41$349.45$123,974.97
127$413.25$350.61$123,624.36
128$412.08$351.78$123,272.58
129$410.91$352.96$122,919.62
130$409.73$354.13$122,565.49
131$408.55$355.31$122,210.17
132$407.37$356.50$121,853.68
Totals for year 11
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 11
$4,965.72 will go towards INTEREST
$4,200.66 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
133$406.18$357.69$121,495.99
134$404.99$358.88$121,137.11
135$403.79$360.07$120,777.04
136$402.59$361.27$120,415.77
137$401.39$362.48$120,053.29
138$400.18$363.69$119,689.60
139$398.97$364.90$119,324.70
140$397.75$366.12$118,958.59
141$396.53$367.34$118,591.25
142$395.30$368.56$118,222.69
143$394.08$369.79$117,852.90
144$392.84$371.02$117,481.88
Totals for year 12
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 12
$4,794.58 will go towards INTEREST
$4,371.80 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
145$391.61$372.26$117,109.62
146$390.37$373.50$116,736.12
147$389.12$374.74$116,361.38
148$387.87$375.99$115,985.38
149$386.62$377.25$115,608.14
150$385.36$378.50$115,229.63
151$384.10$379.77$114,849.87
152$382.83$381.03$114,468.84
153$381.56$382.30$114,086.54
154$380.29$383.58$113,702.96
155$379.01$384.85$113,318.10
156$377.73$386.14$112,931.97
Totals for year 13
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 13
$4,616.46 will go towards INTEREST
$4,549.91 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
157$376.44$387.42$112,544.54
158$375.15$388.72$112,155.83
159$373.85$390.01$111,765.81
160$372.55$391.31$111,374.50
161$371.25$392.62$110,981.89
162$369.94$393.92$110,587.96
163$368.63$395.24$110,192.72
164$367.31$396.56$109,796.17
165$365.99$397.88$109,398.29
166$364.66$399.20$108,999.09
167$363.33$400.53$108,598.55
168$362.00$401.87$108,196.68
Totals for year 14
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 14
$4,431.09 will go towards INTEREST
$4,735.28 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
169$360.66$403.21$107,793.48
170$359.31$404.55$107,388.92
171$357.96$405.90$106,983.02
172$356.61$407.25$106,575.77
173$355.25$408.61$106,167.16
174$353.89$409.97$105,757.18
175$352.52$411.34$105,345.84
176$351.15$412.71$104,933.13
177$349.78$414.09$104,519.04
178$348.40$415.47$104,103.57
179$347.01$416.85$103,686.72
180$345.62$418.24$103,268.48
Totals for year 15
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 15
$4,238.17 will go towards INTEREST
$4,928.21 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
181$344.23$419.64$102,848.84
182$342.83$421.03$102,427.81
183$341.43$422.44$102,005.37
184$340.02$423.85$101,581.52
185$338.61$425.26$101,156.26
186$337.19$426.68$100,729.59
187$335.77$428.10$100,301.49
188$334.34$429.53$99,871.96
189$332.91$430.96$99,441.00
190$331.47$432.39$99,008.61
191$330.03$433.84$98,574.77
192$328.58$435.28$98,139.49
Totals for year 16
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 16
$4,037.39 will go towards INTEREST
$5,128.99 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
193$327.13$436.73$97,702.76
194$325.68$438.19$97,264.57
195$324.22$439.65$96,824.92
196$322.75$441.11$96,383.81
197$321.28$442.59$95,941.22
198$319.80$444.06$95,497.16
199$318.32$445.54$95,051.62
200$316.84$447.03$94,604.59
201$315.35$448.52$94,156.08
202$313.85$450.01$93,706.07
203$312.35$451.51$93,254.56
204$310.85$453.02$92,801.54
Totals for year 17
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 17
$3,828.42 will go towards INTEREST
$5,337.95 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
205$309.34$454.53$92,347.01
206$307.82$456.04$91,890.97
207$306.30$457.56$91,433.41
208$304.78$459.09$90,974.33
209$303.25$460.62$90,513.71
210$301.71$462.15$90,051.56
211$300.17$463.69$89,587.86
212$298.63$465.24$89,122.63
213$297.08$466.79$88,655.84
214$295.52$468.35$88,187.49
215$293.96$469.91$87,717.59
216$292.39$471.47$87,246.11
Totals for year 18
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 18
$3,610.95 will go towards INTEREST
$5,555.43 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
217$290.82$473.04$86,773.07
218$289.24$474.62$86,298.45
219$287.66$476.20$85,822.25
220$286.07$477.79$85,344.45
221$284.48$479.38$84,865.07
222$282.88$480.98$84,384.09
223$281.28$482.58$83,901.51
224$279.67$484.19$83,417.31
225$278.06$485.81$82,931.51
226$276.44$487.43$82,444.08
227$274.81$489.05$81,955.03
228$273.18$490.68$81,464.35
Totals for year 19
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 19
$3,384.61 will go towards INTEREST
$5,781.76 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
229$271.55$492.32$80,972.03
230$269.91$493.96$80,478.08
231$268.26$495.60$79,982.47
232$266.61$497.26$79,485.21
233$264.95$498.91$78,986.30
234$263.29$500.58$78,485.72
235$261.62$502.25$77,983.48
236$259.94$503.92$77,479.56
237$258.27$505.60$76,973.96
238$256.58$507.28$76,466.68
239$254.89$508.98$75,957.70
240$253.19$510.67$75,447.03
Totals for year 20
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 20
$3,149.05 will go towards INTEREST
$6,017.32 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
241$251.49$512.37$74,934.65
242$249.78$514.08$74,420.57
243$248.07$515.80$73,904.77
244$246.35$517.52$73,387.26
245$244.62$519.24$72,868.02
246$242.89$520.97$72,347.05
247$241.16$522.71$71,824.34
248$239.41$524.45$71,299.89
249$237.67$526.20$70,773.69
250$235.91$527.95$70,245.74
251$234.15$529.71$69,716.03
252$232.39$531.48$69,184.55
Totals for year 21
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 21
$2,903.90 will go towards INTEREST
$6,262.48 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
253$230.62$533.25$68,651.30
254$228.84$535.03$68,116.27
255$227.05$536.81$67,579.46
256$225.26$538.60$67,040.86
257$223.47$540.39$66,500.47
258$221.67$542.20$65,958.27
259$219.86$544.00$65,414.27
260$218.05$545.82$64,868.45
261$216.23$547.64$64,320.82
262$214.40$549.46$63,771.36
263$212.57$551.29$63,220.06
264$210.73$553.13$62,666.93
Totals for year 22
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 22
$2,648.75 will go towards INTEREST
$6,517.62 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
265$208.89$554.97$62,111.96
266$207.04$556.82$61,555.13
267$205.18$558.68$60,996.45
268$203.32$560.54$60,435.91
269$201.45$562.41$59,873.50
270$199.58$564.29$59,309.21
271$197.70$566.17$58,743.04
272$195.81$568.05$58,174.99
273$193.92$569.95$57,605.04
274$192.02$571.85$57,033.19
275$190.11$573.75$56,459.44
276$188.20$575.67$55,883.77
Totals for year 23
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 23
$2,383.22 will go towards INTEREST
$6,783.16 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
277$186.28$577.59$55,306.19
278$184.35$579.51$54,726.68
279$182.42$581.44$54,145.24
280$180.48$583.38$53,561.85
281$178.54$585.32$52,976.53
282$176.59$587.28$52,389.25
283$174.63$589.23$51,800.02
284$172.67$591.20$51,208.82
285$170.70$593.17$50,615.65
286$168.72$595.15$50,020.51
287$166.74$597.13$49,423.38
288$164.74$599.12$48,824.26
Totals for year 24
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 24
$2,106.86 will go towards INTEREST
$7,059.51 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
289$162.75$601.12$48,223.14
290$160.74$603.12$47,620.02
291$158.73$605.13$47,014.89
292$156.72$607.15$46,407.74
293$154.69$609.17$45,798.57
294$152.66$611.20$45,187.37
295$150.62$613.24$44,574.13
296$148.58$615.28$43,958.84
297$146.53$617.33$43,341.51
298$144.47$619.39$42,722.12
299$142.41$621.46$42,100.66
300$140.34$623.53$41,477.13
Totals for year 25
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 25
$1,819.24 will go towards INTEREST
$7,347.13 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
301$138.26$625.61$40,851.52
302$136.17$627.69$40,223.83
303$134.08$629.79$39,594.04
304$131.98$631.88$38,962.16
305$129.87$633.99$38,328.17
306$127.76$636.10$37,692.07
307$125.64$638.22$37,053.84
308$123.51$640.35$36,413.49
309$121.38$642.49$35,771.00
310$119.24$644.63$35,126.38
311$117.09$646.78$34,479.60
312$114.93$648.93$33,830.67
Totals for year 26
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 26
$1,519.91 will go towards INTEREST
$7,646.46 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
313$112.77$651.10$33,179.57
314$110.60$653.27$32,526.31
315$108.42$655.44$31,870.86
316$106.24$657.63$31,213.23
317$104.04$659.82$30,553.41
318$101.84$662.02$29,891.39
319$99.64$664.23$29,227.17
320$97.42$666.44$28,560.73
321$95.20$668.66$27,892.06
322$92.97$670.89$27,221.17
323$90.74$673.13$26,548.05
324$88.49$675.37$25,872.68
Totals for year 27
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 27
$1,208.38 will go towards INTEREST
$7,957.99 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
325$86.24$677.62$25,195.05
326$83.98$679.88$24,515.17
327$81.72$682.15$23,833.02
328$79.44$684.42$23,148.60
329$77.16$686.70$22,461.90
330$74.87$688.99$21,772.91
331$72.58$691.29$21,081.62
332$70.27$693.59$20,388.03
333$67.96$695.90$19,692.12
334$65.64$698.22$18,993.90
335$63.31$700.55$18,293.35
336$60.98$702.89$17,590.46
Totals for year 28
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 28
$884.16 will go towards INTEREST
$8,282.21 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
337$58.63$705.23$16,885.23
338$56.28$707.58$16,177.65
339$53.93$709.94$15,467.71
340$51.56$712.31$14,755.41
341$49.18$714.68$14,040.73
342$46.80$717.06$13,323.67
343$44.41$719.45$12,604.21
344$42.01$721.85$11,882.36
345$39.61$724.26$11,158.11
346$37.19$726.67$10,431.44
347$34.77$729.09$9,702.34
348$32.34$731.52$8,970.82
Totals for year 29
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 29
$546.73 will go towards INTEREST
$8,619.64 will go towards PRINCIPAL
MonthInterest PaidPrincipal PaidRemaing Balance
349$29.90$733.96$8,236.86
350$27.46$736.41$7,500.45
351$25.00$738.86$6,761.59
352$22.54$741.33$6,020.26
353$20.07$743.80$5,276.46
354$17.59$746.28$4,530.19
355$15.10$748.76$3,781.42
356$12.60$751.26$3,030.16
357$10.10$753.76$2,276.40
358$7.59$756.28$1,520.12
359$5.07$758.80$761.33
360$2.54$761.33$0.00
Totals for year 30
 You will spend $9,166.37 on your house in year 30
$195.55 will go towards INTEREST
$8,970.82 will go towards PRINCIPAL

Neighborhood Information

 

History
Captain George Vancouver, an English explorer for King George, founded Bainbridge Island in 1792 when he stumbled upon the south shore of the island.  A Suquamish encampment had previously occupied the Island, and after many years they entered the Treaty of Point Elliot in which the Suquamish handed over their islands to the U.S. government.

In 1841, US Navy Lieutenant Wilkes visited the island when surveying the Northwest.  He then named the island after Commodore William Bainbridge who was a commander of a frigate in the War of 1812.  By the late 1800’s, the world largest sawmill was born in Port Blakely bringing mill workers from many different nations.  Near the mill, many Japanese, Hawaiian, Filipino, and Indian communities were established, and Port Blakely grew to have large hotels, schools, foundry establishments (where metal is melted and poured into molds), and shipyards.  The Hall Brother’s Shipyard, located in the town of Winslow, was worldwide known for building large shipping vessels mainly used for hauling lumber.

In 1942, after the Pearl Harbor attack, Bainbridge Island was one of the first communities to respond to Executive Order 9066, where many US citizens with Japanese ancestry were vanished from the island and taken inland to detention camps during WWII.  The community was appalled by this order and gladly welcomed their neighbors home after the war.

Description
Bainbridge Island consists of about 28 square miles and 48 miles of shoreline.  As you look at the island from afar you can see the forested hills, the welcoming harbors, and private homes along the shoreline.  The beautiful forest and beach surroundings are gorgeous, and it’s rare to find a spot on the island that doesn’t offer a spectacular view.  Charming shops, country clubs and jogging trails abound on this lovely island.

Residents
Within the island population of about 21,000, you will find many friendly and diverse communities who value and preserve the island’s history, culture and beauty.  Bainbridge is a close-nit community known for its excellent public schools many high-profile residents.  As the island is located only 35 minutes by ferry from downtown Seattle, many residents find it a far more enticing commute to read the morning paper and watch the gentle waves of Puget Sound than to sit on the packed freeway.  The majority of residents in Bainbridge find it an easy ferry commute to and from work, particularly those working in downtown or Belltown.

Fun Stuff
Located on the island is a combination of farms, wineries, hiking trails and local arts.  The town of Winslow offers many small town shops, restaurants, and other attractions for visitors and residents to enjoy.  Some of those attractions include the Bainbridge Island Historical Museum, the Farmers Market, and Waterfront Park.  Bainbridge Island is also an excellent place to visit for a day trip – a scenic ferry ride, a stroll through the small towns and a round of golf at the Country Club can make for a beautiful day.

 

History
Captain William Ballard is the founder of this sleepy Scandinavian community north of Downtown Seattle. It has mainly been home to fishermen and mill workers over the past 100 years, and continues to attract a large fishing community to the industrial area.

Description
Ballard is well-known in the Seattle area for its strong Scandinavian heritage. All candy shops sell Swedish fish, and “Uff-dah” is seen on signs and bumper stickers when walking down Market Street, the main street leading into the heart of the retail district.

The other main street in the neighborhood is 15th Ave NW.  It runs perpendicular to Market Street starting at the Ballard Bridge and is the main access road to areas north and south of Ballard.  There are also a variety of stores and eateries along its strip.

Residents
Ballard is well-known for its Scandinavian population, merchants, fishermen, and young professionals that live in the area. Due to lower home and rental prices, families and students find the area affordable. Shilshole, North Beach and Blue Ridge attract a wealthier crowd to its view housing options.

Fun Stuff
The Shilshole area and Golden Garden’s Beach are known for great seafood restaurants and beautiful sunsets. The recently renovated park has dog areas, duck ponds, and lovely landscaping to draw walkers and runners to its shores.

 

History
A Union Army veteran by the name of M. Harwood Young moved into the Beacon Hill area with hopes of real estate development.  Young is credited for the naming of Seattle’s Beacon Hill after the historic Beacon Hill in Boston.  Young built a home at the north end of the hill overlooking Elliott Bay and named Massachusetts Street after his home state.

Coinciding with Young’s business ventures, the construction of a streetcar line that ran from the hill to South Snoqualmie Street made Beacon Hill’s real estate industry boom.  Many Italian immigrants inhibited this area to harvest and sell produce to Seattle markets.

Near Hardwood Young’s original estate, the U.S. Health Service opened a U.S. Marine hospital on the north end of the hill.  It opened in 1933 and was responsible for the public health of everyone from servicemen to seamen.  Post World War I, the hospital was used to care for injured or disabled veterans.  Today, the 16-story building still rests on Beacon Hill, but is now known as the Pacific Medical Center.

In the years prior to World War II, the Japanese Language School used Jefferson Park’s grounds for an annual picnic, attracting thousands of Japanese community members each year.  During the war the picnic grounds were deemed off-limits and were instead used for a military recreation camp, and sadly, by the time the war was over, the picnic grounds and an important part of Asian-American tradition in Seattle were both gone.

 

Description
Beacon Hill sits high above the city, bordered by First Hill and Rainier Valley.  Amazon.com’s headquarters are located up on the hill, and the dot com boom caused the area to flourish.  Once a prime tech corridor, the area is now less of a hot spot.  The Pacific Medical Center building is perched at the top of Beacon Hill overlooking downtown Seattle and Puget Sound, which now holds medical clinics and the offices of Amazon.com.

Residents
The Beacon Hill neighborhood boasts a diverse culture with strong community ties. There are lots of single family homes with very few apartments.  Many young professionals live in this area due to its proximity to Amazon, and young professional families often start here.  The area also houses New Holly, a mixed-income community development created by the Seattle Housing Authority, which was recently renovated.

Fun Stuff
One of the highlights of Beacon Hill is Jefferson Park.  Its golf club is one of Seattle’s few public golf courses, and the beautiful park has been a part of Seattle’s history since the early 1900s.  Gorgeous views of the Olympic Mountains and Puget Sound abide in the park.  The Parks Levy in 2000 provided $8 million for reconstruction of the area.

 

History
Pioneers gave Bellevue its name in 1882 from the French word meaning “beautiful view.” One of the town’s earliest settlers was William Meydenbauer, who rowed across Lake Washington from his Seattle home in the 1860s and built a cabin along the shoreline of what is now Bellevue (Meydenbauer Center is named for him). Bellevue was once just a crossroads with a gas station and a grocery store, surrounded by strawberry fields. The city was incorporated in 1953 — its first high-rise was built back in 1969 and towered above its low-rise neighbors at 13 stories high.

Description
Today, Bellevue is a quickly developing city on the east side of Lake Washington. Access to and from Seattle is via either the I-90 bridge or the 520 bridge. Downtown Bellevue is the focal point for growth in business and housing. Its attractions include a multitude of restaurants and coffee shops, Bellevue Square (one of the largest shopping malls on the West Coast), two museums, the flagship King County Library, millions of square feet of Class A office space, a regional convention center, many bookstores, movie theaters, and several parks.

The 443-acre downtown area has evolved into a robust and dynamic regional center of national prominence. While a developing and bustling professional city, it still retains some small-town perks, such as free parking at many stores and buildings. Bus service to and from Seattle is also very accessible and convenient.

Residents
Most Bellevue residents are professionals; many working in the quickly developing technology field. There is a mix of singles, married couples, and families who reside here. Elaborate estates, family homes, small cottages, apartment buildings, and high-rise condominium buildings coexist peacefully throughout Bellevue.

Fun Stuff
Public art is dispersed throughout Bellevue. Bellevue’s public art first appeared in the 1940’s with “Forest Deity,” a wood carving by Dudley Carter at Bellevue Square. Today, over 70 works of public art can be seen outdoors and inside buildings in 16 downtown locations. These include fountains, sculptures, and paintings.

Bellevue Square, The Galleria, Crossroads Mall, and other smaller shopping locations offer some of the most extensive shopping amenities in Washington State. Downtown retail shopping offers a wide variety of goods and services. These businesses generate some of the highest sales-per-square-foot ratios in the nation, making Downtown clearly one of the Northwest’s premier shopping destinations.

Bellevue is often referred to as “A City in a Park” – the Downtown Park, one of many city parks, reinforces that thought. The Downtown Park is 20 acres of beauty in the heart of the downtown. Park features include a 240-foot long, 10-foot high waterfall, a canal enclosing a 5-acre open meadow, a 28-food-wide promenade and a reflecting pool.

Bellevue hosts many events throughout the year, with the highlight being the Pacific Northwest Arts Fair during the month of July. During the fair thousands of visitors meander through hundreds of booths as the fair shuts down part of downtown to allow for the numerous pedestrians that come to buy or look at the beautiful works of art. Bellevue also hosts the Bellevue Home Show, City Hall Art Show, Bridal Fair, Easter Egg Hunt, Summer Music Lunch Concerts, 4th of July Fireworks, and the Seafair Water Festival.

 

History
The Belltown area is located in the north end of downtown Seattle, north of Pike Place Market. Over the past ten years, Belltown has made a name for itself as a stage for local talent. Clubs like the Crocodile Café on 2nd Ave. spotlight local bands, making Belltown an area that draws a crowd to its hip and diverse nightlife. More sophisticated bars/restaurants like Axis and Flying Fish offer a variety of foods and spirits, always drawing a crowd in the evening hours.

Description
The Belltown neighborhood has recently experienced a rebirth, becoming one of the new, trendy areas in the city. Much of the growth in this area has been fueled by growth in the high-tech industry. A number of new, amenity-rich apartment and condominium properties have recently been built with many others in various stages of development. Companies such as RealNetworks and Immunex have redeveloped properties for their headquarters in this area. Also a number of new, “chic” restaurants have recently opened in this neighborhood.

Pike Place Market, made famous by their vendors throwing fish in many national ad campaigns, borders the southern edge of Belltown and continues to be one of Seattle’s most popular attractions. Farmers Market is a haven for local artisans to display their wares – from the freshest produce in Washington to the most unique handcrafted silver jewelry. The Belltown district is also a hub for Seattle’s nightlife. Many of the popular bars and music clubs reside in a labyrinthine-like walkway known as Post Alley. Among the most notable is Kell’s, a traditional Irish pub offering a wide-selection of food and spirits, in addition to live Irish music. Belltown is home to many of Seattle’s posh restaurants like Flying Fish, Brasa and El Gaucho.

Residents
Belltown is a hodgepodge neighborhood: By day, high-tech professionals, urban condo dwellers and office workers share the sidewalks with panhandlers, homeless and low-income residents; by night, it transforms into a bustling mecca for the city’s hottest clubs, bars and restaurants, along with its own very hip artists and musicians.

Fun Stuff
The Belltown Theatre Center was founded in 1992 and continues to produce new works, in addition to offering acting classes. It occasionally showcases
performances by other theatre groups.

The original Cinerama was built in 1963 and was most recently purchased and restored to its original condition by Microsoft billionaire Paul Allen. It was reopened on April 23, 1999, and has been attracting huge crowds ever since due to its technologically advanced sound system.

 

History
Originally Bothell was a swampy, lushly forested area inhabited by the Simump Indian Tribe. David C. Bothell arrived in 1889 and in 1909 became the founding father of this community at the north end of Lake Washington. Lumber and shingle production fueled the areas early economy. In recent years, Bothell has become a major regional employment center consisting of companies from various industries including high-technology and biotechnology.

Description
Bothell is located approximately 12 miles north of Seattle and attracts residents desiring close proximity to Seattle, with the appeal of a small town community. Bothell greets you with a welcoming sign “Stay for a day or a lifetime”. The Bothell community holds an avid interest in maintaining their historical landmarks dating back to the late 1800’s. The Sammamish River runs through Bothell and provides trails, parks and fields for recreation purposes.

 

Residents
Residents of Bothell share the desire to maintain a small town atmosphere and the benefits of a relaxed lifestyle. Young families are attracted the Bothell for their excellent schools and affordable living. In addition, the rapid growth of the business sector has brought thousands of people to Bothell in recent years. With the University of Washington expanding its campus to Bothell, residents are looking forward to the cultural enrichment it will bring.

Fun Stuff
Bothell landing is just south of the city center and serves as the riverside recreational and historic site with a playground for kids and a pedestrian bridge to the Sammamish River Trail. The Bothell Historic Museum is a landmark considering that it was the first schoolhouse, built in 1885, and includes a log cabin on site. The Country Village offers excellent dining opportunities and 40 shops including antique collectibles, gifts, clothing and other items

 

History
The charming Victorian mansions near Volunteer Park bring to the area a sense of prestige. Capitol Hill was home to wealthy timber barons, bankers, shipping magnates and nouveau riche from the Alaskan Gold Rush. It is rumored the neighborhood got its name when many people thought the state capitol would be here (Olympia received that honor).

Description
Capitol Hill is well known for its main drag, Broadway, which is the hub of Capitol Hill’s commercial district. Businesses, eateries, fine dining, and specialty shops line both sides of Broadway and spice up Seattle with their variety, and at times, controversial themes.

Residents
Capitol Hill is a colorful neighborhood that is legendary in Seattle for attracting alternative crowds to its shops, eateries, and parades, while simultaneously catering to its traditional families that have lived in the neighborhood for years.

Fun Stuff
Theaters abound, both for movies and performing arts. There are also weekend street fairs and parades held on and around Broadway.  To experience a truly stunning view of the surrounding area, visit the top of the old water tower in Volunteer Park.  In addition to the water tower, Volunteer Park is offers an outdoor amphitheater for concerts and the Seattle Asian Art Museum.

 

History
The International District and the Central District of Seattle are two of the city’s oldest surviving residential areas and are full of historic buildings and landmarks. Over a century old, immigrants from all over the world made their home in these neighborhoods.  The vibrant mix of European, African and Asian settlers left an incredibly rich abundance of small businesses and restaurants that derive their influences from the owners’ homelands.

Description
The Central District spreads between Lake Washington and Downtown, bordered by E. Madison to the north and Jackson Street to the south.  Filled with great family-owned restaurants and shops, the Central District has a richly diverse culture and community.  Beautiful historic churches, firehouses and other late 19th century buildings line the streets along with these locally-owned gems.

Residents
The Central District has a rich history of being primarily an African American neighborhood, although the past few decades have seen diversification.  Climbing real estate prices on Capitol Hill and First Hill make the central location of the aptly-titled Central District more attractive and affordable then its northern counterparts.  Some longtime residents, however, resent the gentrification that has been taking place.

Fun Stuff
Cultural diversification is a badge of honor for the Central District.  Every year, in early summer, the Central Area Community Festival takes place, promoting volunteerism, future economic development, and increasing neighborhood exposure and community pride. Fun, food and music reign during this event.  The Langston Hughes Performing Arts Center holds classes and performances that promote quality cultural entertainment.  The All Teen Summer Musical and other shows can be enjoyed every year through this great Seattle Parks and Recreation center.

 

History
Columbia City, independent until 1907, was a fast growing mill town even before its association with Seattle as a surrounding neighborhood.  The Seattle, Renton, and Southern Railway brought many to Columbia City when J.K. Edmiston and his partners established it in 1890.  Lumber and merchandise were shipped back and forth from Columbia City to Seattle, as the mill town’s lumber was needed to help restore Seattle’s losses from the fire of 1889. This relationship helped the community to grow into an incorporated city, and in 1907 the residents of Columbia City voted in favor of becoming a Seattle neighborhood. 

As more trees fell, plans to drain the Wetmore Slough and connect as a seaport to the 1917 Lake Washington Ship Canal were implemented but never completed. In 1920 the Slough was covered up and today, it’s the site of ball fields, playgrounds, a new community center, and many beautiful gardens.

Since 1995, with support from the City of Seattle’s Department of Neighborhoods, Columbia City Revitalization Committee has conceived and implemented programs that bring press and business to the neighborhood. Among these are a farmers market, public art and parks projects, and significant support for the neighborhood’s comprehensive plan.

Description
Columbia City is Located Southeast of downtown Seattle and has a population of about 12,300.  When Boeing started to increase its operations and expand, many residential areas became distinct.  Other businesses moved within Georgetown’s neighborhood limits and built warehouses crowding more and more people out of the area.  Today, there is still a battle between

SEED (South East Effective Development) aids the redevelopment of Colombia City.  SEED encourages business establishment, housing preservation, and partnerships that stimulate increased rejuvenation of the neighborhood. SEED administers recently introduced the Good Neighbor Fund that has improved the appearance of 30 local businesses and generated over $150,000 in private reinvestment.

Residents
Due to its proximity to downtown as well as Renton, both Georgetown and Columbia City offer a good location for an easy commute to jobs in those areas.  The Boeing Company employs many residents of the area, which is primarily young families.

Residents are very involved with their community and the two areas have strong relationships with the City of Seattle’s Department of Neighborhoods.  Over the years many revitalization projects have been accomplished in order to make this community a safe, friendly, and attractive place to live.  One of the most recent projects was funded and completed by community member, John Mohn, who restored two historical commercial buildings on Rainier Ave. The next project to undergo within this neighborhood will be the expansion of the Carnegie Library.

Fun Stuff
Many enjoy “Beat Walk” the first Friday of every month.  Visitors and members from the community gather to eat, drink, and listen to local musicians in different venues with a variety of themes.  The Farmers Market is also available every Wednesday starting in mid-May to the end of September.  This is an excellent place gather to sample fresh produce, watch cooking demos, listen to live music, and participate in children activities.

 

History
Downtown Seattle includes the areas around Pike Place Market, Pioneer Square, and the Waterfront. It is bordered by another popular area, Belltown, to the north. Seattle was developed after it was selected as the area’s new harbor in 1852. Dr. David “Doc” Maynard was an early settler who opened the city’s first store and hospital. Maynard’s friend, Chief Sealth, was a Salish Indian after whom Seattle would derive its name. Maynard chose the name “Seattle” as an easier-to-pronounce alternate to the chief’s name. Local farmers established the Pike Place Market in 1907, which is now one of downtown’s most visited landmarks.

The International District and the Central District of Seattle are two of the city’s oldest surviving residential areas and are full of historic buildings and landmarks.  Over a century old, immigrants from all over the world made their home in these neighborhoods.  The vibrant mix of European, African and Asian settlers left an incredibly rich abundance of small businesses and restaurants that derive their influences from the owners’ homelands.

Description
The areas around Pike Place Market are popular with tourists as well as locals. Housing here can be very pricey, as many of the luxury condominium buildings and apartment high-rises claim some of the best views of Elliott Bay. Parking is an issue in downtown, and buildings charge a premium for a reserved space. Coffee shops and souvenir stores crowd First and Second Avenues, along with the Seattle Art Museum. Nordstrom, Macy’s, and other high-end retailers crowd the intersection of 4th and Pike. If you don’t want to search for a spot, try parking at Seattle Center in Queen Anne and riding the Monorail to Westlake Center.

Pioneer Square and the International District have unique, vibrant atmospheres that accompany their rich histories. Many of Seattle’s oldest buildings are located in Pioneer Square and are home to the numerous cafes, galleries and nightclubs that dot the streets.  The International District has some of the best restaurants and locally-owned shops in Seattle. Seattle’s stadiums for the Mariners and Seahawks lie just at the south end of these neighborhoods. Pioneer Square is the most busy, bustling part of the city and it can be too noisy for some. The International District, in contrast, offers a quieter spot with similar amenities and locale.  In 2001, Seattle was shaken by the Nisqually earthquake, which caused extensive damage to the historic brick facades and buildings in this area.

Residents
Residents in the downtown area average between 25-45 years of age. Most are successful professionals, but some areas are mixed with low-income and homeless.

Fun Stuff
Pioneer Square and downtown galleries stay open late on the first Thursday of each month. Artists with their works spread out on sidewalks and musicians and street performers entertain while you shop. Watch the famous “fish throwing” at Pike Place Market, and pick up some fresh produce or flowers. The original Starbucks coffee house is located in Pike Place Market, and sells souvenir mugs available only at that location. Take in an IMAX movie about Mt. St. Helen’s eruption on Pier 59 and stop by the Seattle Aquarium to see the giant octopus. Feed the seagulls at Ivar’s on Pier 54 (and enjoy some of their famous clam chowder). For a bizarre outing, visit “Ye Olde Curiosity Shoppe”. Enjoy a concert at “Summer Nights at South Lake Union Park” which recently switched from “Summer Nights at the Pier” (structural maintenance work was required at Pier 62/63, the popular, former venue). The famous Edgewater Hotel on Pier 67 and the former MTV Real World location on Pier 70 are other interesting sites. Enjoy the Seattle Aquarium on Pier 59 or a ferry ride to one of the nearby islands. You may want to avoid the terminal during rush hour, where island residents pack the ferries on their commute home.  Visit the International District’s Uwajimaya Village which offers great dining and shopping, or take a tour of the stadiums before you catch a game.  View the amazing art at Wing Luke Asian Museum or visit the Nippon Kan Theater to watch movies, concerts, variety shows and more.

 

History
Eastlake was an area heavily forested with trails throughout, but later, it was cleared in order to create orchards and farms. In the early 1900s, the area became know for its large houseboat population. Around 1920, an apartment and housing boom created the charming vintage buildings and houses that attract renters and homebuyers today.

Description
Eastlake is Seattle’s best-kept secret. Its strategic location on the north end of downtown, situated on the east side of Lake Union, makes it a great location for people who want a small neighborhood feel, but the option of being within minutes of downtown. Eastlake Ave., the main drag, offers retail shops, restaurants, and bars, attracting a calm, more mature crowd.

Residents
Due to Eastlake’s close proximity to the University of Washington, students tend to rent in the area. Young professionals employed in the downtown or Lake Union area find Eastlake a desirable location. There also continues to be a somewhat large houseboat population in the area.

Fun Stuff
Eastlake is home to one of Seattle’s favorite restaurants, Serafina. Often rated as one of Seattle’s best eats, Serafina was opened by two New Yorkers in the early 1990s.

Eastlake is becoming a popular place in the evenings with the Motion Lounge, Zoo, and 12 Carrot Café attracting locals and others to its retro establishments.

The P-Patch is another hidden charm in the Eastlake neighborhood. Its attentive gardeners take good care of it, making it a valued community project.

 

 

History
First Hill has possessed several different historical dubbings over time. It was originally known as Yesler’s Hill, after early settler Henry Yesler, who clear-cut the area and set up his sawmill at the bottom. He found that the easiest way to transport lumber to his Mill was to slide it down the road across greased logs, making it the very first Skid Road. Later, the King County Courthouse was placed on First Hill. Attorneys and their clients (who had to climb up the steepest part of the hill to get to the courthouse) apparently cursed and swore as they attempted to summit, and it soon was branded “Profanity Hill”. Now the area, dubbed “Pill Hill” by locals, has a more righteous nickname due to its many hospitals.

Description
Captiol Hill, located just north of First Hill, is well known for its main drag, Broadway, which is the hub of Capitol Hill’s commercial district. Businesses, eateries, fine dining, and specialty shops line both sides of Broadway and spice up Seattle with their variety, and at times, controversial themes. Broadway is a fast-paced district, while Madison St., First Hill’s main drag, holds a quieter assortment of cafes and delis, patronized by customers of the pharmacies and hospitals that line the area. Seattle University is a prominent Jesuit school that marks the dividing line between the two hills

 

Residents
Most residents in First Hill tend to be hospital staff and downtown professionals seeking a short commute.

Fun Stuff
Theaters abound, both for movies and performing arts. There are also weekend street fairs and parades held on and around Broadway.  To experience a truly stunning view of the surrounding area, visit the top of the old water tower in Volunteer Park.  In addition to the water tower,Volunteer Park offers an outdoor amphitheater for concerts and the Seattle Asian Art Museum.

 

History
When you’re half the way across the Fremont Bridge and see the sign “Welcome to the Center of the Universe,” you know you’ve arrived into Seattle’s most artistically eccentric community. Fremont lies north of Downtown and across the Lake Washington Ship Canal. In the 1880s, Fremont was a lumber-mill town. During the Depression, Fremont was where the down-and-outs settled. This proved irresistible in the ‘60s to hippies and bikers, and today Fremont’s charm attracts a diverse crowd from professionals to local artisans.

Description
Eccentric, funky, artsy, and bohemian are words that are frequently heard when describing this self proclaimed republic. The heart of Fremont is located at the intersection of Fremont Ave. N., N. 35th Street, and Fremont Place. Crazy, specialty shops and retro clothing stores line the streets, and great restaurants, ranging from higher-end eats to quick take-out joints make Fremont a culinary delight for hungry shoppers.

One of the most charming aspects of Fremont is the eclectic collection of art tucked away in every nook and cranny. The infamous “Fremont Troll” awaits visitors underneath the Aurora Bridge, while Fremont’s controversial “Lenin” statue stands on a corner near shopping and restaurants. “Waiting for the Interurban” is constantly decorated by locals, and while dining at Costas Opa’s Greek restaurant, patrons can view the latest additions to the statues. “Waiting for the Interurban” sculpture is always dressed in purple and gold when the University of Washington’s Huskies play in the Rose Bowl.

Our Favorite Spots
If you’re in the mood for traditional Italian fare, try The Fremont Classic Pizzeria and Trattoria.  Situated on Fremont Avenue just across the street from St. Paul’s Church, Fremont Classic has been a local, family run pizzeria since 1988.  The restaurant has consistently received superb reviews and we can vouch for the excellent food and friendly service.  Click here for a link to some specials at Fremont Classic Pizzeria.

Residents
Fremont’s population is a mix of primarily artists, students, and young professionals. With the recent addition of high-tech business growth in the area, a large number of high-tech employees have become residents of the bohemian neighborhood.

Fun Stuff
Local artists can be found on Sundays at the Fremont Market. The Fremont Market is a great place to find unique, hand crafted gifts for family and friends.

In the summer, Fremont hosts a movie-going bonanza in the evenings at an outdoor parking lot. All you have to do bring is a chair and a donation and you’re invited to watch the movie projected on the wall of Adobe Systems.

 

History
The Rainier Brewing Company was founded in 1882 and the brick brewing building that is still seen today on Airport Way S in Georgetown, was built in 1900.  The brewery grew to be the largest in the country until the newer brewery was built, which recently closed.

In 1901, the official postal name, D’wamish, was changed to Georgetown.  A few years later, Georgetown became an incorporated city and established road names, police forces, fire brigades, and newspapers.  This only lasted until 1910, when Georgetown became a Seattle neighborhood adapting to the new road names and ways of the city.

Description
When Boeing started to increase its operations and expand, many residential areas became distinct.  Other businesses moved within Georgetown’s neighborhood limits and built warehouses crowding more and more people out of the area.  Today, there is still a battle between Georgetown businesses and the community members.  The continuation of expansion and domination of the businesses within the area have given some residential neighborhoods no choice but to relocate.

Residents
Before landmarks such as Boeing Field, Rainier Brewing Company, and the Georgetown Power Plant existed, Georgetown’s settlers mainly provided the City of Seattle with fresh agricultural goods from their farms.  The settlers in this vicinity were very much a rural community until the area grew in population and took on a more residential character.

There are about 1,300 people living in the Georgetown area. Due to its proximity to downtown as well as Renton , both Georgetown and Columbia City offer a good location for an easy commute to jobs in those areas.  The Boeing Company employs many residents, primarily the heads of young families, in the area.

Residents are very involved with their community and the two areas have strong relationships with the City of Seattle’s Department of Neighborhoods.  Over the years many revitalization projects have been accomplished in order to make this community a safe, friendly, and attractive place to live.  One of the most recent projects was funded and completed by community member, John Mohn, who restored two historical commercial buildings on Rainier Ave. The next project to undergo within this neighborhood will be the expansion of the Carnegie Library.

Fun Stuff
Many enjoy “Beat Walk” the first Friday of every month.  Visitors and members from the community gather to eat, drink, and listen to local musicians in different venues with a variety of themes.  The Farmers Market is also available every Wednesday starting in mid-May to the end of September.  This is an excellent place gather to sample fresh produce, watch cooking demos, listen to live music, and participate in children activities.

If you are in the area, you may want to visit the Georgetown Power Plant Museum, tour Boeing Field, or if you are into scenic attractions you may want to visit Gateway Park.  Gateway Park offers Duwamish River beach access for launching canoes and kayaks.  It is maintained by the neighborhood and located at the west end of Eighth Avenue S.

 

History
Greenlake attracts runners, walkers, skaters, and (of course), dog walkers. At one time a trolley ran from Greenlake to downtown in order to connect people to one of the most popular recreation spots in Seattle. Even today, Greenlake remains one of the best areas to spend an afternoon due to its close proximity to the Woodland Park Zoo, Lower Woodland Playing Fields, and the Greenlake Golf Course.

Description
Greenlake is surrounded by bicycle, coffee, ice cream, and rollerblading shops. The specialty bakeries and tasty restaurants like Six Degrees, Duke’s Chowder House, and Tacos Guaymas add to the cozy atmosphere of the area.

Residents
Greenlake is a thriving single-family neighborhood with a mix of long-time residents and young professionals. Most of the commercial and apartment properties are located toward the north end of the lake. Here you will find a mix of college students, recent University of Washington graduates and young professionals. People come daily from all over the city to take advantage of Greenlake’s beauty and outdoor activities.

Fun Stuff
Residents can be found jogging, biking, or taking in the natural sights around the lake, rain or shine. There are lots of events around the lake including crew races, the Milk Carton Derby, and Christmas-time lighting of the luminaries. The east side of the lake has a pool, gym, basketball courts, a community center, restrooms, tennis courts, a playground, a windsurfing area, and soccer, volleyball and softball fields.

The south side of the lake has a small craft center offering classes in rowing, kayaking, sailboarding and sailing.

 

History
Greenwood, originally called Woodland, was mainly known as a boggy area of town that was home to the 40-acre Woodland Cemetery and very few retail establishments. As the trolley routes from neighboring Greenlake and Phinney Ridge were extended, this area began to develop. Former Governor, Henry McBride, purchased and developed the cemetery in 1907. After moving all the bodies to nearby Crown Hill Cemetery in Ballard, Gov. McBride named the new development the Greenwood Park Addition. In the 1940’s, the Greenwood Commercial Club created a “Miracle Mile” along Greenwood Avenue. This addition of shops, bakeries and medical offices finally allowed Greenwood to become a self-supported neighborhood and helped to further separate it from Phinney Ridge.

Description
The main commercial district of Greenwood is located around the intersection of NW 85th St. and Greenwood Ave. NW.  It bustles with shops, banks and diners, in addition to being a very heavy trafficked area.  Quieter, residential areas lie to the north and south of NW 85th St., with the southern parts of Greenwood closely resembling the Phinney Ridge area. Bungallows and newer homes are more affordable here, than in the areas closer to Downtown Seattle. Apartments in this area are mostly older, 1960’s-1970’s construction, although newer developments are cropping up on NW 85th St., just west of Aurora Ave. N.

Residents
The Phinney Ridge/Greenwood area consists primarily of long-time, local and young middle to upper-class professionals. Young professionals continue to migrate to the area, as real estate prices can be relatively reasonable for such a convenient Seattle location. Many affluent families and individuals are also attracted to the fantastic, westerly views of the Olympic Mountains Phinney Ridge

Fun Stuff
Around the Woodland Park area, Phinney Ridge has an abundance to offer those who enjoy nature. The Woodland Park Zoo, Woodland Park Rose Garden, and Woodland Park all lie just southwest of Greenlake, across Aurora Ave. N. The award-winning, 188-acre zoo has carefully created natural habitats and landscapes. The 2.5 acre rose garden has been around since the late 1800’s. The park itself offers athletic activities, from cycling and walking to organized team sports.  The Red Mill Burger Company is a tasty spot popular among locals, but you might have to wait in a line that stretches out onto the sidewalk at times. The Phinney Neighborhood Center hosts a variety of interesting classes and events, including puppet shows and fitness classes.

Greenwood and Phinney team up for the Annual Art Walk in May. Greenwood also puts on the Greenwood Classic Car & Rod Show in June. If that is not enough, it is just a stone’s throw from nearby Greenlake, as well as all the park activities in Phinney Ridge. For those who enjoy shopping, Northgate Mall and Seattle’s first two-story Target store are only a short drive north.

 

History
The Bitter Lake neighborhood bordering Puget Sound in northwest Seattle reaches north from N 105th Street to the city limits at N 145th Street, and is bounded on the east by Aurora Avenue N. It is home to Bitter Lake, which beckoned many of the first settlers to the area.

It drew its identity from an amusement park called Playland that operated on the south shore of Bitter Lake for 30 years, beginning in 1930. The Seattle-Everett Interurban trolley line ran through the heart of the neighborhood, bringing people and goods to the area and hastening its development. The Bitter Lake area was a timbered land of Douglas fir and cedar, often eight feet in diameter, inhabited by Native American lake people who gathered and fished from abundant resources.

Fortunate early settlers found available flatland to farm and, since there were no roads, floated their produce to Seattle markets via Puget Sound. Other farmers farther inland and farther north raised poultry. A small, lake-bound sawmill operation at the southwest corner of Bitter Lake. The tannic acid from logs dumped into the lake was so bitter that horses refused to drink from it, thus giving the 20-acre pond its name. The Bitter Lake Sawmill remained active until 1913.

 

Description
Bitter Lake is neither owned nor controlled by the City of Seattle. All property owners with land abutting the shore share in its control. Under Washington state law, developers are prevented from building out over the Lake.  The lake is within walking distance of the new library and retirement homes and is backyard to the elementary school and community center. Today, condominiums and other multi-family homes have replaced farmhouses and other homes, and both Bitter and Haller Lake are now urban villages.

Residents
The residents of Bitter and Haller Lake tend to primarily be small, young families.  With its close proximity to Shoreline Community College, Northgate and I-5, the area is also good for students and people employed in the city who are looking for slightly less expensive housing than that found in neighborhoods closer to downtown.

Fun Stuff
The Bitter Lake and Haller Lake neighborhoods offer a community center, Highland Ice Arena, and a Creative Dance Center which are all fun, family-oriented options for entertainment.  Additionally, Bitter Lake Park features large climbing structures, swimming, areas for sand play, picnic tables, and a wading pool, playing fields, and tennis courts.

 

History
Downtown Seattle includes the areas around Pike Place Market, Pioneer Square, and the Waterfront. It is bordered by another popular area, Belltown, to the north. Seattle was developed after it was selected as the area’s new harbor in 1852. Dr. David “Doc” Maynard was an early settler who opened the city’s first store and hospital. Maynard’s friend, Chief Sealth, was a Salish Indian after whom Seattle would derive its name. Maynard chose the name “Seattle” as an easier-to-pronounce alternate to the chief’s name. Local farmers established the Pike Place Market in 1907, which is now one of downtown’s most visited landmarks.

The International District and the Central District of Seattle are two of the city’s oldest surviving residential areas and are full of historic buildings and landmarks.  Over a century old, immigrants from all over the world made their home in these neighborhoods.  The vibrant mix of European, African and Asian settlers left an incredibly rich abundance of small businesses and restaurants that derive their influences from the owners’ homelands.

Description
The areas around Pike Place Market are popular with tourists as well as locals. Housing here can be very pricey, as many of the luxury condominium buildings and apartment high-rises claim some of the best views of Elliott Bay. Parking is an issue in downtown, and buildings charge a premium for a reserved space. Coffee shops and souvenir stores crowd First and Second Avenues, along with the Seattle Art Museum. Nordstrom, Macy’s, and other high-end retailers crowd the intersection of 4th and Pike. If you don’t want to search for a spot, try parking at Seattle Center in Queen Anne and riding the Monorail to Westlake Center.

Pioneer Square and the International District have unique, vibrant atmospheres that accompany their rich histories. Many of Seattle’s oldest buildings are located in Pioneer Square and are home to the numerous cafes, galleries and nightclubs that dot the streets.  The International District has some of the best restaurants and locally-owned shops in Seattle. Seattle’s stadiums for the Mariners and Seahawks lie just at the south end of these neighborhoods. Pioneer Square is the most busy, bustling part of the city and it can be too noisy for some. The International District, in contrast, offers a quieter spot with similar amenities and locale.  In 2001, Seattle was shaken by the Nisqually earthquake, which caused extensive damage to the historic brick facades and buildings in this area.

Residents
Residents in the downtown area average between 25-45 years of age. Most are successful professionals, but some areas are mixed with low-income and homeless.

Fun Stuff
Pioneer Square and downtown galleries stay open late on the first Thursday of each month. Artists with their works spread out on sidewalks and musicians and street performers entertain while you shop. Watch the famous “fish throwing” at Pike Place Market, and pick up some fresh produce or flowers. The original Starbucks coffee house is located in Pike Place Market, and sells souvenir mugs available only at that location. Take in an IMAX movie about Mt. St. Helen’s eruption on Pier 59 and stop by the Seattle Aquarium to see the giant octopus. Feed the seagulls at Ivar’s on Pier 54 (and enjoy some of their famous clam chowder). For a bizarre outing, visit “Ye Olde Curiosity Shoppe”. Enjoy a concert at “Summer Nights at South Lake Union Park” which recently switched from “Summer Nights at the Pier” (structural maintenance work was required at Pier 62/63, the popular, former venue). The famous Edgewater Hotel on Pier 67 and the former MTV Real World location on Pier 70 are other interesting sites. Enjoy the Seattle Aquarium on Pier 59 or a ferry ride to one of the nearby islands. You may want to avoid the terminal during rush hour, where island residents pack the ferries on their commute home.  Visit the International District’s Uwajimaya Village which offers great dining and shopping, or take a tour of the stadiums before you catch a game.  View the amazing art at Wing Luke Asian Museum or visit the Nippon Kan Theater to watch movies, concerts, variety shows and more.

 

History
The name “Issaquah” appears to be an Anglicized version of the Native American’s spoken word “Isquoh”, meaning “the sound of birds”. It is said that migratory peoples gathering food in and around Lake Sammamish would imitate the sound of local waterfowl taking flight.

The town originally was incorporated under the name Gilman, which honored Daniel Hunt Gilman, who was responsible for bringing the railroad to the area in 1889. It wasn’t until 1899 that the town requested permission from the Washington Legislature to change the name to Issaquah.

Despite the steady growth, Issaquah remained a relatively isolated community until the 1940 opening of the Lake Washington floating bridge. Before 1940, the population fluctuated between 500 and 1,000. By 1962, Issaquah had 2,000 residents, and by 1968, it jumped to more than 3,500. Today the population numbers exceed 11,000 and are continuing to grow.

Description
Issaquah has developed into a bustling residential community located on I-90 approximately 18 miles East of downtown Seattle. Many of its residents are drawn here by Issaquah’s scenic beauty, located at the base of the Cascade Mountains. As you drive out I-90 toward Issaquah much of what you see is undisturbed forests.

Residents
The City of Issaquah has approximately 10,000 residents and covers an area of 10.85 square miles. Because of the large number of planned communities Issaquah has one of the largest concentrations of young families in the area. Many of the residents are young professionals that want the suburban lifestyle away from the hustle and bustle of the city. Issaquah offers a short commute to Bellevue and a 30-45 minute commute into Seattle .

Fun Stuff
Issaquah is a community-oriented town that hosts major events such as “Salmon Days” during the first weekend in October, in addition to 4th of July activities, which include a town parade and fun contests. The 488-seat Village Theatre, completed in 1995, produces a nationally acclaimed mainstage season of family favorite musicals, comedies and dramas. The company continues to use its 1914 vintage theater for original musicals in development, and as the year-round home of Kidstage productions.

Numerous lakes provide many recreational opportunities. Snoqualmie Pass is a thirty minute drive, and offers good skiing. The many trails in the Issaquah foothills have earned the City the title of “Trailhead City.”

There are a variety of recreation and entertainment facilities for community and social gatherings. These include a Community Hall, the Julius Boehm Swimming Pool, Tibbetts Creek Manor regional conference center (used for cultural and social events), Tibbetts Valley Park (a major athletic facility) and the Issaquah Community Center (used for athletic programs, youth, senior, cultural and civic activities).

 

History
The City of Kirkland was named after a British-born steel tycoon, Peter Kirk, who came to the Northwest in the 1880s seeking new development opportunities. In 1880, the Moss Bay Iron and Steel Works was built by Kirk and several prominent Seattle businessmen. A rail line to the Pass and a ship canal to Puget Sound were both constructed, but due to a stock market crash in 1893, the iron and steel mill were closed.

Kirkland’s shipbuilding industry began on the Lake Washington waterfront with the construction of ferries. For 20 years, most of the boats on Lake Washington were either built or repaired in the Kirkland area. By 1940, Kirkland’s Lake Washington Shipyard was building warships for the U.S. Navy. More than 25 warships were built during World War II on what is now Carillon Point.

The City of Kirkland continues to grow. In 1974, the Totem Lake neighborhood became part of Kirkland. The neighborhoods of South Juanita, North Rose Hill, and South Rose Hill joined Kirkland in 1988, bringing the city to its present population of 44,000. At the time, these were the largest annexations undertaken in the state in nearly two decades, adding three and one-half square miles to the city as well as 16,000 new residents.

Description
Located on the eastern shores of Lake Washington, Kirkland is a suburban city infused with vitality and a young attitude where joggers, shoppers, business people and retirees all mingle along the boulevard. It’s a town where international corporate headquarters and small businesses coexist, and where you can choose between movie theaters and community theaters.

Kirkland is a scenic destination with a variety of attractions to offer people of all ages. Picturesque parks are available for such activities as swimming, fishing, and various athletics. The marina is a great location for someone to dock their boat and have a picnic on the breathtaking shore of Lake Washington.

Kirkland is a town for all people with ample housing options, civic services, active community programs, convenient shopping, great schools and exciting entertainment. In Kirkland you will find an emphasis on the arts, education, business development, natural resources and the quality of life. These values are the pride of the community that many work to enhance.

Residents
Kirkland offers anything from bluff-top condos to waterfront estates – its downtown eateries and galleries have become a home for young professionals, executives, two-career families and grandparents. Many are employed in the region’s booming industries such as software and aerospace. Kirkland’s cozy outlying neighborhoods, away from the water, are an affordable haven. The relatively safe community offers peace-of-mind to residents, where school children commonly walk to school.

Fun Stuff
The City of Kirkland has a total of 33 city, county, and state parks, which provide citizens with the opportunity to visit natural, open spaces. The parks offer many activities for all ages. Each park gives a unique variety of scenic settings, many with a waterfront view. Kirkland’s parks have a reputation for being well landscaped and lush throughout the year. The parks are popular among visitors looking for a family picnic location, a place to hike through trails, or just to rest and relax in natural settings. Kirkland’s downtown hosts community events such as the Bite of Kirkland and Kirkland Art Festival.

 

History
Lake City grew in a different way than its bordering neighbors. While most of the Seattle neighborhoods grew up around trolley stops, Lake City grew along roadways, forcing the area to develop in a long line (now Lake City Way) rather than around a hub. Its roots lay as a peaceful lakefront area with small stores, but development came with the busy street. During Prohibition, bootleg clubs sprang up along Lake City Way with tourist cabins and motels. For a while, Lake City stood on its own as a town, but was eventually annexed by Seattle in 1957.

Description
Today Lake City retains much of its original small town atmosphere with much of the neighborhood sheltered from traffic.  Tight-nit communities still exist in the residential parts of Lake City, but there are an abundance of apartments along busy Lake City Way.  The neighborhood manages to feel secluded due to its location in the utmost northeast corner of Seattle, but the commute across to I-5 or around the northern edge of Lake Washington is still quite quickly accessed.

 

Residents
Lake City has a mix of low-middle income families and professionals.  As it’s on a busline to the University of Washington, Lake City also offers affordable housing to students willing to make a short commute to get to classes.

Fun Stuff
Plenty of antique stores and second-hand shops line Lake City Way and NE 125th St, along with strip malls and local businesses.  The Lake City Library, just off of 125th St, was designed by Seattle architect John A. Morse and has won many awards. The library’s gorgeous bronze front gates were designed by Seattle’s celebrated sculptor George Tsutakawa.  The Lake City Community Center has great programs for children, and intriguing art sculptures line the median on Lake City Way between NE 123rd St and NE 127th St.

 

History
Madison Park, named after President James Madison, has retained the beachfront resort charm it was known for in the 1800s, and attracts more than just tourists these days. Permanent residents of Madison Park have since settled in the area, and today Madison Park has the tightest rental market in Seattle.

Description
Madison Park has the feeling of a small town and locals know one another when they pass on the street. Some of the most enchanting old houses line the streets and upscale bistros and cafes attract out-of-towners and locals to their sidewalk dining and window shopping. Madison Park has quaint stores and businesses and prides itself on its unique setting.

Residents
Madison Park is known for its strong community ties and affluent Seattle residents. Residents are mainly wealthy professionals that work together to keep the area traffic-free and homey for long-time locals. The median income in Madison Park is more than double that of other neighborhoods. Even the smallest homes are priced well above what they would be in other areas of Seattle.

Fun Stuff
Madison Park and beach is where neighborhood residents play in the sand, wade in the roped-off area, or swim out to the dock to dive into the crisp water. On a clear day, a gorgeous view of Mt. Rainier becomes your backdrop. At the park’s north end, sunbathers lounge on towels in the grass beside the fishing and small boat pier. You’ll still see some dilapidated wooden pilings at the edge of the water where the steamship Lincoln used to dock for its seventeen-minute commuter run to Kirkland. To the south, neighbors compete on two lighted tennis courts. Watch for the Christmas Ships sailing by in December.

 

History
Once the hunting and fishing grounds for the Duwamish tribe, the ancient salmon bed known as Madison Valley has undergone much change. In the 1860s, Judge John McGilvra purchased parts of Madison Park and Madison Valley and cut a straight road known as Madison Street.  Seattle’s roads generally run east to west, so Madison Street’s diagonal path goes against this status quo.  It is the only straight path from Elliot Bay’s salt water to Lake Washington’s fresh water. McGilvra later donated a section of waterfront for a park; the popular Madison Park.

Although the First World War spurned a housing and economic boom in Madison Valley, caused by the additional shipyard workers moving into the area, some feel Madison Valley has been overlooked by Seattle for many years.  The 1940s brought economic success to many surrounding neighborhoods, but Madison Valley was overlooked when the trolley car came through and declined into a state of brothels and slums.

Description
Madison Valley is located south of Madison Park, east of Capitol Hill and north of Madrona. Crime was a major factor in the early 1990s but has since decreased.  Madison Valley is omitted in some maps and descriptions and grouped with Madison Park and Madrona.

Residents
Madison Valley is known for its diversity, unlike it’s neighbor to the north, Madison Park. The early part of the 20th century saw a large number of Finnish people moving into the area.  In the 1960s, Madison Valley, Madrona, and the Central District had pivotal roles in the Seattle civil rights movement.  Many residents are moving to the area to take advantage of the greenbelts, buslines and central location that the neighborhood offers.

Fun Stuff
Madison Valley is very proud of its array of greenbelts and parks.

Madison Park and beach, just slightly north, is where people come to play in the sand, wade in the roped-off area, or swim out to the dock to dive into the crisp water. On a clear day, a gorgeous view of Mt. Rainier becomes your backdrop. At the park’s north end, sunbathers lounge on towels in the grass beside the fishing and small boat pier. You’ll still see some dilapidated wooden pilings at the edge of the water where the steamship Lincoln used to dock for its seventeen-minute commuter run to Kirkland. To the south, neighbors compete on two lighted tennis courts. Watch for the Christmas Ships sailing by in December.

 

History
Magnolia was named by a sailor who thought the trees crowding the bluff were Magnolias, when in actuality, they were Madronas. The name stayed with this charming neighborhood north of Downtown and west of Queen Anne , and continues to be called Magnolia today.

Description
This small area of the city holds low crime and a mix of very expensive houses and tiny, charming bungalows.  Along W. McGraw St., the Magnolia Village offers a nice selection of shops and dining establishments, as well as professional offices.  Fisherman’s Terminal is another fun place to eat and shop while watching boats pull into the docks.

In addition to the shopping and restaurants available in Magnolia Village, residents of Magnolia enjoy quick access to attractions in Belltown and Downtown.  Less accessible are the I-5 and I-90 interstates so commutes to South Seattle or the Eastside are more time consuming.

Our Favorite Spot
If you are looking to watch the game, unwind in a very welcoming environment, or just get a quick bite to eat for a great price, stop by the Boxcar Ale House.  It can be reached easily by 15th Ave W, located at 3407 Gilman Ave, across from the Burlington Northern Tracks.  Boxcar Ale has not only a wide variety of selected drafts, but also a very appetizing and delicious menu.  We love it- now you try! 

Residents
Younger inhabitants have begun moving into this area, which in years past has been dominated by older, long-time residents.  The diversity of housing options has promoted this.

Fun Stuff
Discovery Park is one of Seattle’s largest, covering 534 acres. There are also a great number of “pocket-parks” throughout the neighborhood. Another popular place is the West Point Lighthouse that was built in 1881.

Seafair’s Magnolia Summer Festival in August features juried art shows, live stage entertainment, food vendors, and a sidewalk sale. There is also a children’s and main parade during the same weekend.

 

History
In its early days, the Duwamish Indians refused to inhabit Mercer Island for fear that an evil spirit resided there. They thought that the island sank into the water each night and surfaced again at morning. Eventually, pioneers began to settle there for the abundant timber for the logging industry and pastures for dairy farming. Mercer Island was named in 1860 after the Seattle pioneer family, the Mercers. Automobile access from the mainland was finally created in 1940 with the construction of the world’s largest floating concrete bridge, now known as I-90.

Description
Mercer Island is home to many of Seattle’s affluent residents, and has earned the nickname “Mercedes Island” by locals. It is an urban island located in the center of Lake Washington, giving easy access to both downtown Seattle and the Eastside’s “technology corridor” via the I-90 floating bridge. This area is primarily a single-family neighborhood with a quiet, almost rural feel. Mercer Island is home to many parks, wooded hills and some of the best views in the area.

On the north end of the island, shops, restaurants, artwork and benches line the streets of the quaint downtown business district. This area is also where the primary concentration of apartments and condominiums is situated.

Residents
Many of Seattle’s most affluent residents make their home on Mercer Island; including former Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen. Because of the convenient access to both the Eastside and Seattle, wealthy professionals and high-tech employees choose to live here as well.

Fun Stuff
Boaters will feel right at home on Mercer Island. Access from the island on Lake Washington to the Puget Sound is made easy via the Hiram Chittendon Locks.

Mercer Island’s old-fashioned Summer Celebration is a favorite local festival held during the second weekend in July. Clowns, fireworks, jugglers, crafts and more appeal to residents.

More than 475 acres of parks grace the island, including one that runs on top of the I-90 West tunnel. This 22-acre park creates one of the most expensive and unusual stretches of interstate in the country.

 

History
Montlake is surrounded by water on all sides – on the west: Lake Union, on the east: Lake Washington, and on the north: Lake Washington Canal.  When the Duwamish Indian Tribe resided in the Montlake area they used these waterways as a portal to navigate through the region.  When settlers like Harvey L. Pike started exploring the land in 1853, they quickly caught on to the commercial potential.  A proposal was made to build a canal between the two lakes to allow the movement of lumber from east to west.  In 1860, Pike began digging this proposed canal from Lake Union to Union Bay by hand, using a pick and shovel.  He soon gave up and sold the rights in 1871 to a company headed by Judge Thomas Burke.  By 1885 it was completed and adopted the name “The Portal Canal.”

In 1909, the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition was held at the University of Washington campus. It was the result of a 4-year effort and 10 million dollars in contributions.  The Exposition marked the anniversary of the Klondike Gold Rush, and was used to demonstrate the growth and development of commercial trade within the Pacific Rim.  Japan quickly agreed to participate and the event turned into a multicultural gathering welcoming over 80,000 people on its opening day. The revenues and funds from the Exposition brought new opportunity for the Montlake area; new roads, bridges, and parks were built.

Description
Montlake consists of approximately .96 square miles, and has a population of about 4,000.  This neighborhood is north of Capitol Hill and very close to the University of Washington and Route 520. Jogging trails, beautiful houses and scenic surroundings make it a great spot to get away from the bustle of urban life.

 

Residents
Being centrally located makes Montlake the ideal place to live for many UW professors, students, and other young professionals who may work for the Eastside high-tech companies.
Homeowners in this area are long-time residents and young families. Rental opportunities are not as prevalent in Montlake as in other areas of Seattle due to its small geographical size. The area is mainly comprised of residential homes and families.

Fun Stuff
Within this Seattle neighborhood, residents have access to many parks, community activities, UW campus, and museums.  The Washington Park Arboretum is one of the biggest parks in this area with 230 acres of luscious trees providing biking, hiking, and jogging trails for many to enjoy.  Another park that is enjoyed in this neighborhood is the Interlaken Park, which is comprised of 51.70 acres of hiking and jogging trails.

Montlake Community Center offers many youth classes and activities, as well as adult activities such as dance, Martial Arts, crafts, fitness, and pottery classes.  The Community Center has a playfield, gymnasium, pottery studio, and many class rooms for seminars and community events.

If you love history, visit the Seattle Museum of History and Industry. This museum attracts 60,000 visitors annually, and has grown to be the largest privately owned heritage organization in Washington State. This museum captures the history of the Pacific Northwest, and specializes in many diverse cultural, social, and economic aspects.

 

History
George Brackett, a young logger, originally founded the city of Edmonds in 1866.  Due to a high tide and a northern wind, Brackett mistakenly was washed ashore just north of what is known today to be the Edmonds Kingston ferry dock.  Now known as one of the oldest towns in Snohomish County, Brackett guided Edmonds to become a very reputable mill town, one of the most beautiful scenic stops in the Puget Sound, and a key element in the coastal railway.

From the time when originally founded, Everett had become an industrial town fairly quickly. The cities first mill, Puget Sound Pulp and Paper Co., was located downtown and many referred to Everett as the “City of Smokestacks.”  Everett’s enormous railroad system was known for transporting minerals and mill products all over the state.  A vacant roadbed can only now trace a railroad that once carried ore from the mines of Monte Cristo to the smelters of Everett.  Before the initial discovery and industrial boom, Everett was known to be an old Indian Campground.  This city has since preserved and respected the native cultural aspects of the community.

As a city “built for and settled by war veterans,” Mountlake Terrace still has traces of the two-bedroom, concrete block townhomes that were made for the World War II Veterans.

Description
Mill Creek is known as being the cleanest and most well planned community in the Pacific Northwest.  Shopping areas are clean, streets and sidewalks are litter and gravel free, and there are many upscale shops and restaurants.

Balancing nature, culture, and business are only a few of the priorities that are stressed within the Edmonds community.  Edmonds is known for its spectacular views of the Puget Sound and Olympic Mountains.  From the waterfront many can gather to watch whales and enjoy the peaceful scenery, in which is strictly protected by all community members.

In recent years, Everett has made an effort to expand and develop more lodging, parks, restaurants, gift shops, a microbrewery, and a larger marina.

Residents
In Mill Creek, private homes and apartment buildings have well landscaped yards, immaculate exteriors, and friendly residents.  There are 9,300 residents in Mill Creek and the number is steadily growing.

Recently, Edmonds has opened up to expansion in tourism, real estate, and economic development.  The community has joined together to encourage tourists to visit Edmonds and enjoy all it has to offer.  As far as permanent housing, there are about 35,000 residents and within the next 5 years a population boom is expected.

The mills have now diminished and have turned Everett from being a “run-down mill town” to an upscale living community.  More than a third of Everett’s 87,000 jobs have been offered by the city’s main employer, Boeing Co.

Mountlake Terrace is 75 percent residential and has become a popular place to reside.  In the downtown area, the homes are enriched with historical old world charm and are great for starter homes.  Because this city is just less than 4 square miles, the community members are closely linked with each other and local businesses.

Fun Stuff
With time to spare, many enjoy the walking paths, bicycle lanes, parks, golf course, and country club Mill Creek has to offer.   Edmonds is known for its performing arts such as the Edmonds’ Olympic Ballet, Cascade Symphony, arts festival, music concerts, theater and writing groups, visual arts, library, historical museum, and the annual Taste of Edmonds culinary event.  Local community members as well as the Mayor and arts commissioner promote these cultural events in order to keep the cultural experiences alive.

Where the mills of Everett once remained operative, they now remain vacant and have become tourist attractions.  Hiking and biking trails run through the old milling grounds and wildlife attractions have boomed.  Everett offers many wildlife watching tours and parks for those who enjoy the venturing out into the wetlands of the Snohomish River.  Boeing also brings in an enormous amount of tourists to its Paine Field plant where the 747, 767, and 777 jetliners are assembled.

 

History
Snoqualmie Valley is the ancestral home to the Snoqualmie tribe. The name is derived from “Moon the Transformer.” Settlers began to arrive in theValley in the early 1850’s.  The Valley was found to be a very fertile plain with an abundance of edible bulbs, roots, berries, and wild game.  By 1877, several logging operations flooded the region and transported timber by river to Everett and the Puget Sound.  It continued when a railroad system was built in 1889, expanding the mode of transportation for the valley’s timber.  The same year a civil engineer took it upon his self to construct an underground power plant at the base of Snoqualmie Falls.  The power plant opened jobs up for many locals and provided electricity to establish a small company town.  In 1911, a second power plant was built and is still used today.

Located just 30 miles outside of Seattle, North Bend has grown over the years as the Seattle population has expanded to its city limits.  Being once a timber town, converting fir and cedar into everything from dimension lumber to doorframes. The population boom has brought new funds for roads, schools, utilities, housing, and has allowed local businesses to grow.

In the late 1800’s, Swedish-American immigrants, August and Emil Lovgren and Olaf Edwin, opened a logging mill next to the Seattle Lake Shore and Eastern Railway.  Most of them being of Swedish decent, the mill drew hundreds of families to Preston and Fall City.  The towns were so populated with Swedish-Americans that the local church in Preston continued to be conducted in Swedish until 1939.  The mill remained in operation until the mid-late 1900’s.

Description
Antique steam engines and rusted railroad cars are just bits and pieces of Snoqualmie Falls history and are proud remnants of the logging town’s past.  The locals in these communities pride themselves on what the towns have become and how well they have maintained a community spirit throughout the years.  Local school administrators work closely with each individual child to make sure that they are getting the education needed, and many of the parents are very involved with the schools themselves.  These peaceful towns offer the safe and secure feeling of belonging to an old and established community.

Residents
These cities’ residents are primarily families or retired persons, but a branch of Nintendo has added some young professionals in to the mix.  Snoqualmie Falls is home to 2,000 people and local businesses.  The effort to escape a growing suburbia has increased in the recent years, but the town has resisted dramatic change and the friendly community atmosphere has stayed the same.  The friendly close-knit community has only become closer in the recent years and they plan on keeping the small town values alive.  North Bend is called home by more than 5,000 people and the number is continuously growing as families move from Seattle to this Eastside area.  Residents of the Fall City and Preston areas enjoy the comfortable feeling of being part of a laid-back, close-knit community.  Many of the families work in businesses in the downtown areas; some also grow pumpkins, garlic, corn, cucumbers, eggplants, squash and other food items, and manage cattle.

Fun stuff
Downtown Snoqualmie is where residents walk along Railroad Avenue and kids ride their bikes. Fans of “Twin Peaks,” which was filmed in this area in the early 1990s, often stop by the Mar-T Café for some cherry pie.  Beautiful flowers are hung every year to bring a colorful addition to the historic buildings.  Every year an estimated 1.5 million tourists come to see the Snoqualmie Fall’s spectacular plunge over the 268-foot drop.  A hike to this location is a must for any Seattle resident. Just a bit further down I-90 will take you to Seattle’s nearest ski slope, Snoqualmie Pass.  North Bend’s numerous outlet malls also draw a crowd, particularly right before the holiday season.  And the area’s hiking trails offer spectacular views on a clear day, while fishing on the Snoqualmie River and Si View Golf Course can make for a relaxing weekend.

 

 

History
Port Townsend, settled in 1851, was called the “city of dreams” because of the potential for its excellent harbor. With the Depression came shattered hopes, and Port Townsend never quite reached the size and wealth its settlers had expected. At the tip of the Olympic Peninsula is Port Angeles, who’s surrounding forests provided logging material for cities up and down the west coast. Bremerton is home to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, which was a leading force for the west coast in repairing and building ships in both World Wars. In the early 1900s, the shipyard was the largest employer in the region. By the 1960s, everything from small battle ships to nuclear submarines were being repaired in its docks.

Description
Port Townsend has remained a sleepy, charming town filled with beautiful historic buildings and lovely surroundings. Vashon Island thrives on the arts with its frequent gallery showings and music events. With about a half hour commute to downtown Seattle on the ferry, Vashon is an option for downtown workers who don’t need a car. Bremerton holds the largest shipyard on the west coast, providing plenty of military jobs.

Residents
Many loyal residents of Port Townsend have lived in the area for decades, and it is primarily made up of families and retired persons. Vashon Island has younger families and professionals commuting in to downtown Seattle , but still has a strong, close-nit community. Port Orchard’s scattering of suburban apartments brings more younger families and professionals. A large amount of Bremerton’s 36,000 residents work at the shipyard.

Fun Stuff
One of this area’s greatest outings is spending a day on Blake Island. On the island, Tillicum Village offers an Northwest Coast Indian cultural experience with native dancing, art and food in a beautiful longhouse. Scenic trails weave through the state park, and small camp grounds are available. A summer farmer’s market, art museums, charming shops & cafes and quaint B&Bs abound in Port Townsend, while Port Angeles is known for its excellent outdoor activities – everything from hiking & snow-shoeing in the Olympic Mountains to surfing along the coast. Port Orchard’s antique mall and delightful shops are fun to wander.

 

History
A Scottish-Canadian named Guy Phinney purchased the Ridge that now bares his name in 1889. He was a wealthy Scottish immigrant who developed the land into a lush park and gardens known as Woodland Park. The property cost him $40,000, but was later sold to the City of Seattle for $100,000. The property was thought by most to be too far north of the city to be of any value, but once Seattle’s trolley system added the Phinney Ridge route, the area began to develop.

Description
Phinney Ridge is situated at the top of a 350-foot ridge, and lies just north of  Fremont and between Ballard  and Greenlake. It is known for being home to the Woodland Park Zoo, as well as having fabulous views of  Downtown Seattle and both the Cascade and Olympics mountain ranges. Greenwood Ave. N. is the commercial stretch, with restaurants, shops and funky coffeehouses. Parking and crowds can be a concern near the zoo, which draws more than a million visitors each year. While this area has much to offer in rental houses, there are also apartments that line Phinney Ave. N. along the ridge.

Residents
The Phinney Ridge and Greenwood areas consists primarily of long-time, local and young middle to upper-class professionals. Young professionals continue to migrate to the area, as real estate prices can be relatively reasonable for such a convenient Seattle location. Many affluent families and individuals are also attracted to the fantastic, westerly views of the Olympic Mountains Phinney Ridge offers.

Fun Stuff
Around the Woodland Park area, Phinney Ridge has an abundance to offer those who enjoy nature. The Woodland Park Zoo, Woodland Park Rose Garden, and Woodland Park all lie just southwest of Greenlake, across Aurora Ave. N. The award-winning, 188-acre zoo has carefully created natural habitats and landscapes. The 2.5 acre rose garden has been around since the late 1800’s. The park itself offers athletic activities, from cycling and walking to organized team sports.

Greenwood and Phinney team up for the Annual Art Walk in May. Greenwood also puts on the Greenwood Classic Car & Rod Show in June. If that is not enough, it is just a stone’s throw from nearby Greenlake, as well as all the park activities in Phinney Ridge. For those who enjoy shopping, Northgate Mall and Seattle’s first two-story Target store are only a short drive north.

 

History
Queen Anne, once an overgrown forest, attracted rich settlers who made their fortune during the Alaskan Gold Rush. These rich settlers built lovely mansions that grace the slopes of Queen Anne today. The neighborhood was named for the Queen Anne architectural style of its early Victorian mansions.

Description
Queen Anne is located north of downtown, and is considered a neighborhood of choice for those who work in Downtown Seattle or on the Eastside due to its strategic location. Rentals in upper Queen Anne surround Queen Anne Ave., the main thoroughfare, and are also found in surrounding blocks. Upper Queen Anne Ave. is sprinkled with specialty shops, ranging from upscale dress shops to local pubs. Rentals in the lower Queen Anne, surrounding Seattle Center, are also much sought after. There you will find many exotic restaurants and coffee shops in abundance. The west side of Queen Anne faces Magnolia, and the Interbay golf course. This industrial area has fewer apartment buildings, and more fast-food joints and retail shops. On the eastern part of Queen Anne, the area is mainly commercial but rentals on the Lake Union side boast of beautiful views of the water. the Seattle Center area.

Residents
Upper Queen Anne is home to long-time residents and has a higher number of residential homes. The lower part of Queen Anne has more rentals and tends to attract young professionals, students, and artists. Queen Anne is a mixture of people from every income bracket. It is considered a high rent district in Seattle and its plentiful apartment buildings and historical mansions draw renters and home buyers alike into the area.

Fun Stuff
The Seattle Center is located at the base of Queen Anne and many consider it the cultural heart of Seattle. It is home to the three major performing arts organizations: the Seattle Opera, Pacific Northwest Ballet and the Seattle Repertory Theatre. It is also home to the Seattle Children’s Museum and the Pacific Science Center. Several professional sports teams also call the Seattle Center home; the Seattle Sonics basketball team (NBA), Seattle Thunderbirds hockey team (WHL), and Seattle Storm basketball team (WNBA) all host their home games at the Key Arena.

On June 23, 2000 the Experience Music Project opened at the Seattle Center. Love it or hate it, the unique, Frank Gehry-designed steal structure (described by the Seattle Times as “the wreck of the Partridge Family bus”) is now an unmistakable landmark of Seattle Center.  This interactive music museum combines hands-on experiences with interpretive exhibits that tell the story of the creative process in American popular music. EMP is the first institution of its kind.

Bumbershoot, Seattle’s favorite music and art festival, takes place at the Seattle Center every Labor Day weekend. It is one of the most innovative, inexpensive and inspiring arts festivals in the country, with a four-day showcase of extraordinary art, culture and entertainment. Enjoy music, theatre, dance, film and video, literary arts, comedy, kids arts, and more. The Northwest Folklife Festival at the Seattle Center is the annual ethnic, folk, and traditional art festival. Artists create an ethnic extravaganza embracing music and dance performances, visual arts and folklore exhibits.

Our city’s most famous landmark, The Space Needle, is located at the Seattle Center and many make the surprisingly short elevator trip to the top for a fantastic view of the. It additionally holds a unique, revolving restaurant.  At the base of the Needle, an amusement park and fun center is present. Queen Anne also has numerous parks that circle the hill offering relaxing scenic overlooks. Kerry Park, on the south slope, is a favorite among locals and tourists for its magnificent view of the Seattle skyline, Elliott Bay and Mt. Rainier.

 

History
The first residents of Rainier Beach were Native Americans who lived along the edge of Lake Washington.  Food gatherers in the area called themselves hah-chu-ahbsh, or lake people. A commonly used trail which bisected the Rainier Valley eventually became a railroad line.  It shortened what used to be an all-day trek in to Seattle to a mere two hours.  This railroad eventually evolved in to today’s Rainier Ave South.

The area was once named Atlantic City, and had many of its namesake’s features, including a pier and bathhouse. In the early 1900s, Rainier Beach was one of the most desirable areas in this region.  By 1907, the city of Seattle had annexed the city.  When the Lake Washington Shipping Canal was cut ten years later, the lake level dropped nine feet, causing one of Rainier Beach’s rivers to disappear and  Pritchard Island to turn in to a peninsula.

Description
Rainier Beach is located on Lake Washington in the southeast part of Seattle, bordered by Beacon Hill to the west, and Columbia City to the north.  It is a culturally rich neighborhood with very strong community ties due to a large amount of religious institutions and neighborhood associations in the area.  New development and renovation is now taking place all over Rainier Valley, causing property prices to rise.

Residents
Many of Rainier Beach’s residents have lived in this culturally rich area since the 1930s.  There are also plenty of new families calling this area home, as well as students and some young professionals who commute in to downtown.  Located close to both I-90 and I-5, Rainier Beach offers an easy commute for those working on the eastside or in southern cities such as Renton.  Crime was once a problem, but has dropped significantly in recent years.

Fun Stuff
Many small ethnic restaurants are developing in the area and offer great eats. Be’ersheva Park, which is named for Seattle’s sister city in Israel, is among the many parks in Rainier Valley – including Martin Luther King Jr. Park, which boasts incredible views.

 

History
Years ago, the Sammamish branch of the Duwamish Indian tribe used the Redmond area for food collection, hunting, and fishing. In 1964, an archeological site was discovered near the Clise Mansion in Marymoor Park and explored until 1970 by a team of University of Washington archeologists. The Marymoor Prehistoric Indian Site is currently listed in the State and National Registers of Historic Places.

Over Redmond’s first 40 years, population grew slowly from 303 residents in 1912, to 573 residents in 1950, and 1,426 in 1960. 2000 estimates had the population close to 50,000.  In 1963, the Evergreen Point Floating Bridge was completed and today, the population has multiplied to over 40,000.

Description
Much of Redmond’s glory comes from nature in Lake Sammamish and its valley, which was carved out by glaciers and is flanked by wooded hillsides. There are numerous views of Mount Rainier to the south. Some of Redmond’s glory comes from human endeavor the park system is always a works in progress.

Redmond enjoys a diverse and growing economic base. Redmond is home to some of the major high-tech firms in the country, including Microsoft, Nintendo of America, Allied Signal Avionics, Primex Aerospace Company, Spacelabs Medical, and Physio-Control. Redmond is also the headquarters of such businesses as Eddie Bauer and Genie Industries, and is the regional headquarters of Safeco Insurance Company. The city’s strong retail sector was dramatically enhanced by the Redmond Town Center, a 1.4 million square foot commercial development.

The effort to meet the needs of people benefiting from this economic growth has brought its own boom. Redmond is the fifth largest city in King County, with the fifth fastest growth rate from 1990 to 1997. The high concentration of high-tech, high-paying jobs ranks Redmond 20th of 522 urban areas in affluence.

Residents
With Microsoft and Nintendo having their headquarters in Redmond, a younger work force has been recruited in the technology field. Young professionals, as well as an increasing number of families enjoy Redmond as their home.

Fun Stuff
Befitting a city on the move, Redmond acquired 48 acres of parkland in the first eight months of 1998, bringing its total acreage to 1,315. Altogether, the city has 34 facilities with a wide variety of uses. The largest is the 800-acre watershed preserve, the location of much of the eight miles of new trails opened by the city in 1998. Other notable facilities include the teen center, operating out of the old firehouse, a senior center, a county-operated swimming pool, a collection of farm animals at Farrel-McWhirter Park, a downtown clock tower and eight neighborhood parks.

Developed in the early 1970s, before the freeway reached Redmond, Marymoor Park preserves a broad expanse of the Sammamish Valley. Marymoor is an active regional county park, including such features as a climbing wall, a field for radio-controlled airplanes and a velodrome – an oval bicycle track for organized racing. An off-leash exercise area offers dogs and their owners a chance to socialize.

Redmond also has the distinction of being known as “the Bicycle Capital of the Northwest.” The State’s only indoor-cycling velodome is located in the City along with an annual bike race through the streets.

 

History
Renton was founded in 1901 by Erasmus Smithers and at that time was considered a Wild West frontier town. Renton has come a long way since muddy streets and covered wagons, yet continues to take pride in its rich history. Coal mining fueled Renton’s early economy until the 1940’s when the Boeing Company arrived and World War II demanded mass airplane production. Due to Boeing’s prominence in this community, Renton has been appropriately nicknamed the “Jet City of the World”.

Description
Renton is located approximately 15 miles Southeast of Seattle and 6 miles from Seattle-Tacoma international airport. The Cedar River flows through Renton, with the public library literally on the river offering fabulous views of salmon nipping at flies. The legendary Jimi Hendrix is buried at the Greenwood cemetery where tourists come to pay their respects to this famous musician.

Residents
A large number of the residents of Renton are employed by Boeing or work for companies relying on Boeing’s success. These residents are very involved in developing quality education and preserving their historical past. 2001 marks the celebration of Renton’s centennial anniversary and the community is invited to share memories of Renton from decades past. If you are looking for a rather quiet, quaint and affordable environment, close to Seattle and its international airport, Renton may be the place for you.

Fun Stuff
Renton recently welcomed Cedar River Brewing Company, an upscale brewery offering tours and savory pints. Lake Washington and the Cedar River provide terrific recreational activities including boating, swimming, biking, jogging, or for a mellower activity, a relaxing picnic on their tranquil shores. The Renton Historical Society offers exhibits of the Duwamish Indians, the earliest descendants of the area, displaying their photographs, artifacts, and memorabilia.

 

History
Sandwiched between the Redmond and Issaquah plateaus, Sammamish is one of the newest neighborhoods in western Washington. Sammamish officially became a city on August 30, 1999 and lies on about 13,000 acres of land. The area was formerly a part of both Redmond and Issaquah, but the name originally comes from a branch of the Duwamish Indian tribe who lived in this area. Sammamish broke apart from its neighbors to become its own incorporated city and is slowly developing a character all its own. Small forests and rolling hills surround long, beautiful Lake Sammamish, which was formed by ancient glaciers cutting through this terrain. The lake now connects the cities of Bellevue, Redmond, Issaquah and Sammamish.

Description
Still a part of the Lake Washington and Issaquah school districts, Sammamish shares much of its personality with Redmond, Issaquah and Bellevue . The hill that makes up Sammamish rises from East Lake Sammamish Parkway up to Redmond-Fall City Road. Sammamish enjoys being called a `family friendly, kids safe community’ and has made that the city’s motto.

 

Residents
Sammamish is mostly a family-oriented neighborhood mixed with single professionals primarily working in the field of technology. Microsoft’s Redmond campus and its upcoming Issaquah Highlands campus bring many employees to the area, and the suburban lifestyle is appealing for those fed up with city living. A commute to downtown Bellevue takes only a few minutes, while downtown Seattle offices are about 30 to 45 minutes away during morning traffic.

Fun Stuff
Closer to Issaquah and under development is the East Lake Sammamish Center, which boasts Pacific Northwest’s only Krispy Kreme Doughnuts. Lines can stretch down the street when locals gather for their morning fix. This area will soon be home to new retail stores, restaurants, offices and apartment buildings. East Sammamish Park and Pine Lake Park are both beautiful and joggers and bicyclists enjoy the East Lake Sammamish trail that winds along parallel to the lake. On the north side of the lake is Marymoor Park, home to an off-leash area for dogs and expansive walking trails. Twenty minutes away to the east is Snoqualmie Falls, offering another beautiful hike ending in a spectacular view of the 270 ft waterfall.

 

History
Laurelhurst was once a Duwamish Indian campground until the signing of the Point Elliot Treaty in 1855.  After the signing the Duwamish Indians were removed from the land and then resided at the Suquamish Indian Reservation on the Kitsap Peninsula.

During white settlement in the 1860’s, Laurelhurst was home to King County’s first sheriff, William H. Surber (aka Uncle Joe), and founder of a small saw mill, Henry Yesler.  Surber served as sheriff, federal marshal, and contracted many of the railroad trestles that ran through Seattle at that time.  He also enjoyed hunting the Union Bay (Laurelhurst) land for venison in which he supplied to the local market.

Yesler’s sawmill turned the city into a busy town.  He built the sawmill in the perfect location near Lake Washington in order to clear out the shoreline.  Clear-cutting this area allowed agricultural growth and development, but it was only for a short while before the real settlement occurred.   Today only remnants of the old farms and orchards can be seen with in the residential areas.  In 1910, Laurelhurst became a neighborhood of Seattle.  Being the neighborhood furthest away from the city, Laurelhurst used boat transportation for many years to commute to and from the city.

Description
Today, this neighborhood is filled with large private homes, spectacular views of Mt. Rainier and Lake Washington, wonderful shops, restaurants and other attractions.  The Laurelhurst neighborhood is located on a peninsula on the western shore of Lake Washington.  The western boundary is University Village and the University of Washington Campus.  Sand Point and Windermere are the northern boundaries and on the east is Lake Washington.

Residents
Today there are about 8,000 residents in Laurelhurst.  The Laurelhurst homes feature Northwest architecture (Tudor, colonial, and craftsman homes) with beautiful views of the Cascade Mountains to the east, or Lake Washington on the West.  Many UW professors, students, and other young professionals call Laurelhurst home.

Fun Stuff
Both public and private schools are offered in this area, and an abundance of shopping at University Village is just around the corner.  Since the local community park, Laurelhurst Playfield and Park, has 13 acres and the Burke-Gilman Trail crosses through this area, Laurelhurst is a great stomping ground for joggers, bikers, and hikers of all ages.

 

History
The South Lake Union neighborhood played an important role in Seattle’s history.  Native Americans were the early settlers of South Lake Union and it was a trailhead for major trails headed for Elliott Bay and the Duwamish River. David Denny, an original Seattle pioneer, claimed land in 1853 extending from Mercer to Denny Way. The lake was originally one-third larger than it is today. A small bay extended inland to Mercer Street and a stream ran through and around Boren Avenue.

Description
Today South Lake Union is an urban neighborhood transformed. It has become one of the trendiest addresses in Seattle. It is now primarily a mix of restaurants, historical boats, kayak rentals, yachts for sale, and seaplane rides, all connected by a shoreline boardwalk.

Located close to downtown, Queen Anne and Capitol Hill, the South Lake Union neighborhood is situated in a prime location for many employers.  It is home to Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the world’s finest cancer research institute. One of the leading edge biotechnology companies, Zymogenetics (dedicated to the prevention and treatment of human diseases), has also made its headquarters in South Lake Union.

South Lake Union is being developed at an incredible rate.  Updates to South Lake Union park have been recently completed, and new cafes, grocery stores and shops are soon to come.  The properties in South Lake Union display a unique architecture of the working 1920’s. Buildings display a refreshing variety of decoration, including excellent examples of terra cotta, ornate brick patterns, and multi-pane industrial windows.

Residents
With its central location, properties in South Lake Union offer an easy commute – Fred Hutch and Zymogenetics are within walking distance, a short bus ride gets you to companies located in Belltown or downtown, and eastside commuters have quick access to I-5.  This teamed with the new development means many young professionals make their home here.  Students and professors at University of Washington also occasionally settle in South Lake Union due to its proximity and easy bus access to the school.

Fun Stuff
South Lake Union Park is a unique urban gem destined to become a popular, close-in waterfront park as it develops. Known officially as the South Lake Union Seaport Park, the City of Seattle is turning the former Naval Reserve base and armory on the lakefront into a 12-acre, $35 million park.

The flagship REI store (80,000 sq. ft!) is an outdoor adventure store that is a favorite of locals and visitors alike. The building’s main attraction is a 65-foot indoor climbing wall (one of the world’s tallest indoor walls!) just inside the entrance. It’s open to all levels of ability. Test hiking boots or mountain bikes on the loop trail outside, enjoy an espresso next to the waterfall, plan trips with the help of Park Service or Forest Service personnel at the in-store Outdoor Recreation Information Center, or simply wander through the clothing and gear. The store also features an auditorium where you can watch outdoor presentations and clinics most evenings.

Run by volunteers, the Center for Wooden Boats is a small boathouse that is also a hands-on maritime museum. Its purpose is to preserve our rich, vital and varied small craft heritage by preserving both the artifacts and the time-tested maritime skills. Featuring rental of classic wooden boats, sailing lessons, workshops, and a relaxing atmosphere of hand-crafted artistry to knock your socks off!

Right next door is the Maritime Heritage Center, with vintage wooden boats, including the Wawona. Constructed in 1897, this was the largest three-masted sailing schooner built in North America and the first American ship to be listed as a National Historic Site. Built with six- by eight-inch planks that are 120 feet long, the Wawona is open for self-guided public tours daily.

Chandlers Cove on the south end of Lake Union encompasses two marinas with a small shopping area and several restaurants, including Hooters, Chandler’s Clubhouse, Dukes’ Chowder House, and Cucina! Cucina! Several other restaurants are at the nearby Yale St. Landing mall.

Seattle’s oldest park, Denny Park, is a quiet spot amid busy streets. Denny Park lies on pioneer, David Denny’s, land claim, and was donated to the City by Denny and his wife in 1864. The park continues to host the Seattle Parks and Recreation Administration building as well as a ball field, children’s play area, picnic facilities, and a public restroom.

 

History
Historians say that today’s Kent was once beneath the sea until 5,000 years ago, when an explosion on Mt. Rainier sent mudflows and other debris into the sea.  These flows carved a ravine into the landscape, which is known today to be the White River.  This River created a fertile plain that lured many mid-1800 settlers into taking advantage of the lush farmland.  The settlers utilized all the resources of the land by clearing the land of timber to make space for farms, and fishing in the river for salmon.  Dairy farming became the dominant industry in the late 1800’s, and the first Carnation milk was produced in Kent in 1899.  In 1914, a concrete dam was built in Auburn to divert the White River, and the White River Valley then turned into the Green River Valley.  Farming remained the city’s dominant industry until 1963 when another dam was built and competed on the upper part of Green River.  The dam then converted the land from a rich agricultural valley to a project of commercial development in the industrial, transportation, and distribution fields.

Being apart of the initial White River Valley and now the Green River Valley, Auburn has many of the same industrial development qualities as Kent.  Auburn was founded by settlers in the mid-1800’s who were drawn in by the fertile soil of the valley.  Because Auburn has the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe within the city limits, there had been many confrontational battles with the natives over the farming land.  Auburn was also known for being a big railroad town.  It was here that the junction of the Northern Pacific’s transcontinental met coastal routes and the extensive marshaling yards.  Although since then many of the railroads operations have been shut down, the system still plays a role in the community today.

Description
Kent is now the 10th largest city in Washington State.  Despite the large advances in industrial developments, Kent still remains to have “small town” values.  Many local residences can say that there is a sense of safety and security, where everyone looks out for everyone else in the community.  Kent has an older community of those who had seen the agricultural boom in the late 1800’s to the mid-1900’s and then the commercial development that is still taking place today.

Today Auburn has become more commercialized and there are many attractions that draw people to this friendly community.  Puyallup, named by the local Indian tribe, means “land of generous people.”  Once small community, Puyallup is picking up its pace and expanding keeping certain values close at hand.  Because Puyallup is expanding, the community maintains an atmosphere where people feel safe and secure, despite the loss of farmland and the growth of suburbia.

Residents
Within an eleven-mile radius there are 30,000 people living within the city limits pf Puyallup.  Boeing, General Services Administration, Federal Aviation Administration, and Auburn Regional Medical Center contribute to the tens of thousands of jobs that are offered to the 36,000 plus people residing in Auburn today.  The farmland and rural areas are still present, but more young professionals are starting families in these areas.  Both commercial and residential construction is expanding, and there is now a major amphitheater halfway between Auburn and Enumclaw to draw crowds and jobs.

Fun Stuff
Emerald Downs, The Super Mall, and the Muckleshoot Casino are just a few of the main attractions in Auburn.  Every year, the Western Washington Fair attracts 1 million people to Puyallup in the fall, and other events that happen annually at the fairgrounds attract people from all over the state.  There are a lot of fun festivals and parades, such as the Daffodil Parade and Spring Fair.  Within the fertile valley, Puyallup produces flower bulbs, berries, and rhubarb.

 

History
The University of Washington was founded in 1861 on a plot of land near today’s Paramount Theater in Downtown Seattle. In 1895 it moved to its current location adjacent to Union Bay. Today the only remnants of the University’s brief downtown stay are four pillars standing near the Paramount, the original University Book Store at 4th and Seneca and the busy downtown street named University.

Many of Seattle’s early settlers graduated from the school and believed it was the most important asset to Seattle, even more so than the state capitol. “Capitol Hill” was the original spot for Washington’s state capitol, but prominent Seattle residents pushed to have the University instead, sending the capitol to Olympia.

Description
The beautiful University campus overflows with cherry tree blossoms in spring and offers a great view of Mt Rainier as a backdrop to Guggenheim Fountain. The main drag near the school is University Way, known as “The Ave.” It is lined with coffee houses, trendy stores, ethnic restaurants and movie theaters. Down the hill from the school campus is the upscale University Village shopping center. The Burke-Gilman hiking trail crosses through this neighborhood and connects with Wallingford to the west.

Traffic can be slow along 45th St, where the Safeco Insurance building is located, and along Montlake Blvd, especially when Husky Football games draw thousands of spectators to cheer on the local team. Street parking is very difficult to find during the day when commuting students and faculty fill spots.

Residents
The “U District” consists mainly of students and faculty members attending the university, but also a mix of young professionals and artists call the University District home. The vast majority of residents rent, although a few families own homes further north.

Fun Stuff
In May, the U District thrives during the opening of boating season. On opening day, locals gather at “The Cut” between Lake Washington and Union Bay to watch the crew races and view the festive boats that participate in this event. During summer the University District Street Fair takes over a few blocks near the campus for a weekend and festivities go on throughout the day. When football season arrives in the fall, the Washington Huskies become the main focus for many in the area.

 

History
Wallingford is a charming neighborhood that is nestled between Greenlake, Fremont and the University District . Gas Works was once an operational plant that created an industrial center in Wallingford. Now the plant is closed, and kite-flyers can be found on windy days maneuvering their kites high in the Seattle sky.

Description
Wallingford is a great location for commuters to Downtown , the Eastside, or the University of Washington because of its close proximity to freeway access. The area has seen major growth in restaurants and pubs in the last ten years, and vintage movie theatres attract a large crowd of movie-goers in the evenings. Gas Works Park is a favorite Seattle park that offers a beautiful view of Lake Union from its grassy hills, and a funky surf shop called Urban Surf lures surfers and skateboarders to its colorful displays.

Residents
Homeowners in this area are long-time residents and young professionals. Wallingford attracts students from Seattle Pacific University and the University of Washington, however, rental opportunities are not as prevalent as in other areas of Seattle. The area is mainly comprised of residential homes and families.

Fun Stuff
Wallingford got a facelift during the 1980s with the development of Wallingford Center in an old school building, establishing the 45th St. Community Clinic, and the rehab of the Good Shepherd center. The sign at the new food store was supposed to say “QFC,” but after residents rallied against tearing down the old “Food Giant” sign, a compromise was struck: It now spells out “Wallingford”. Resident runners dress up for the annual Wallingford “Pumpkin Push” race which supports health care for the homeless. Gasworks Park offers a windy, hilly landscape perfect for kite flying.

 

History
Discovered by Captain George Vancouver in 1792, it wasn’t until 1851 that Seattle’s first settlers landed. Charles Denny landed at Alki with the rest of the Denny party. A monument at Alki beach commemorates the city’s birthplace in 1851. While once connected only by ferry, the West Seattle Freeway now links West Seattle to the rest of the city.

Description
The main commercial district in West Seattle is situated at the top of the hill, at the intersection of SW Alaska St. and California Ave. SW. Known locally as “The Junction” this area is filled with shops and cafes. Another commercial sector is situated near the intersection of SW Alaska St. and Fauntleroy Way SW, just east of this area.

The Admiral neighborhood is situated in the north part of West Seattle and is one of the more affluent neighborhoods in West Seattle. This area boasts a number of interesting shops and dining establishments. The historic Admiral Theater is the predominant landmark of this area.

West Seattle’s prized-possession, Alki, is one of Seattle’s favorite summer hot spots. It is an area situated along the north and west sides of the peninsula and features a long, breezy beach that can feel like a tropical resort on sunny days. The views of Downtown Seattle and the Olympic Mountains are spectacular on clear days.

Along the southwest slope, Fauntleroy is a private residential area that offers its residents unmatched views of the Puget Sound, Vashon Island, and the Olympic Mountains and Peninsula.

The industrial area of West Seattle is known as Delridge. It is situated in the southeast quarter, where security is an issue in some areas. If you are considering renting in this area, you are advised to explore this neighborhood carefully before selecting a place.

While West Seattle offers attractive options for those commuting to downtown, it is not a good option for those making the trip to the Eastside. It involves very heavy traffic on all routes that direction, which can be over an hour at peak times.

Residents
The residents of West Seattle range from long-time locals to the many younger professionals that now call it home. Many of the very affluent have chosen to live in West Seattle for the spectacular views this area offers. There has also been a significant growth in young professionals moving to West Seattle, attracted by the more affordable real estate prices. As a result, many of the neighborhoods have experienced significant gentrification as of late.

Residents of the Admiral area tend to be middle-to-upper income professionals, many of whom are longtime West Seattle residents. Fauntleroy and Alki’s lower and middle income families are slowly being replaced by professionals and wealthy retirees. The median income in Delridge is lower than in most of West Seattle; rents and real estate prices tend to be much lower as well.

Fun Stuff
For the outdoor enthusiast, Alki is a prime hang out. Rollerblading, cycling, and jogging are popular activities along the bike path, and the beach offers plenty of space for kite flying and volleyball. People are drawn to Alki to experience the beautiful sunsets, or to enjoy some of the local eateries situated along the beachhead. The 37-foot Alki Lighthouse offers spectacular views of the area. The U.S. Coast Guard runs tours of this working facility on weekends from May to September. On the edge of the Sound, Lincoln Park offers spectacular summer swimming and barbequing.

 

History
The Woodinville valley was once a rural community surrounded by hills, lakes and rivers.  A scattering of farms and houses were spread across a 40 mile area until the 1970s, when residents from the city started to move out to the area.  A large amount of upper income housing emerged along with Woodinville’s new tenants, but many kept a barn and horses in the backyard of their homes.  Today Woodinville is rumored to have more horses per capita than any other place in the country, despite the surplus of shopping centers and malls that sprouted up in the 1980s.

Description
Woodinville is situated approximately 20 miles northeast of Seattle and 10 miles north of Bellevue.  A morning commute from Woodinville to Seattle via State Route 520 is approximately 45 minutes depending on traffic.  Woodinville’s own downtown is rapidly developing with new retail stores and offices cropping up, but the rural feel of this area has not been lost.  The Sammamish River cuts through the city and winds up to Bothell, while houses and farms are nestled amongst lovely forest settings throughout much of the city.  Woodinville’s official slogan perfectly fits the character of this city: “Country Living, City Style.”

Residents
Due to its proximity to Redmond, many high-tech employees have moved out to Woodinville with their families in to the newer housing developments.  The beautiful, sprawling homes in isolated districts create close-nit neighborhoods.  These residents join the established households and their spacious farmland, resulting in a mix of younger and older families, while in the downtown Woodinville area and the neighborhoods closer to Redmond, there tends to be more young professionals.

Fun Stuff
Woodinville is home to renowned wineries and breweries, such as the world-class Chateau St Michelle winery, the Columbia winery and Redhook Brewery.

On a clear summer day, hot air balloons dot the sky about Woodinville’s valley as the Spirit of Washington dinner train chugs along beneath them.

Molbaks, Washington’s world-famous greenhouse and nursery, offers a beautiful selection of local and exotic plants for purchase.  The Hollywood School House, a coveted spot for weddings and receptions, was once a brick schoolhouse in the early 1900s.  Now a historic landmark, the School House sits across the street from Antiques at Hollywood, with over 100 antique dealers in one spot.